This week’s fresh listings (scroll down):

 

This page is to be updated every Tuesday and will contain all the latest Coin, Medal & Token listings for that particular week.

 

Additions to www.HistoryInCoins.com for week commencing Tuesday 18th December 2018

 

 

Previous Weeks’ Listings (scroll down this page for “This Week’s Listings”):

 

WTH-6644:  Henry VIII Hammered Silver York Half Groat.  Initial mark Key, struck under Archbishop Lee of York.  Spink 2348.  Nice grade.  £130

 

WTH-6645:  Henry VIII Hammered Silver Half Penny.  Initial mark Portcullis, 1st issue coin struck at London.  Spink 2334.  Nice grade.  £85

 

WTH-6646:  1573 Elizabeth 1st Hammered Silver Three Farthings – a very rare x2 month only issue.  Initial mark Acorn – in operation 1st November 1573 to 31st December 1573 only.  Spink 2571.  An uncommon denomination with a very rare date / initial mark combination.  £95

 

WCA-6647:  1688 James II Full Silver Crown.  QVARTO edge in very strong lettering.  A rarer date in the three year series.  £395

 

WI-6648:  1722 Type 1 Irish American William Wood Copper Halfpenny.  About VF.  Rare in this grade, rarer still being this first issue.  £355

 

WMH-6641:  Henry II “Tealby” Hammered Silver Penny.  Bust A, 1158-1163, WILLEM MA of Thetford.  Spink 1337.  Old tickets here – an apparently unrecorded obverse die.  An old crease mark, one or two minor contact marks but overall - bearing in mind this is not a northern mint coin (ie Carlisle or Newcastle) where you expect nice round coins with decent strikes - a choice example of a Thetford Tealby penny.  £375

 

WMH-6642:  Edward III Hammered Silver Groat.  London mint.  Fourth coinage, 1351-77.  Type C (Lombardic M, cross 1), circa 1351-2 only, Spink 1565.  Ex Cromwell Coins.  Slightly off-struck on a full flan (obverse).  A very nice coin.  £175

 

WTH-6643:  1573 Elizabeth 1st Hammered Silver Three Halfpence – a very rare x2 month only issue.  Initial mark Acorn – in operation 1st November 1573 to 31st December 1573 only.  Spink 2569.  An uncommon denomination with a very rare date / initial mark combination.  £165

 

WSC-6634:  1745 Scottish Jacobite “Carlisle Taken” AE Medal.  Medallic Illustration 605/261.  The Scottish rebels, under Prince Charles, advanced as far south as Derby at which point they considered the dangers which threatened them, and promptly retreated back up the western side of England, back into Scotland.  They left a garrison in Carlisle which, after some show of resistance, was surrendered to the Duke of Cumberland.  It should be noted that these medals were struck quickly after the event and were in no way up to the quality of other medals issued from around this time.  From a small collection.  £195

 

WSC-6635:  1745 Scottish Jacobite “Carlisle Taken” AE Medal.  Medallic Illustration 605/261.  The Scottish rebels, under Prince Charles, advanced as far south as Derby at which point they considered the dangers which threatened them, and promptly retreated back up the western side of England, back into Scotland.  They left a garrison in Carlisle which, after some show of resistance, was surrendered to the Duke of Cumberland.  It should be noted that these medals were struck quickly after the event and were in no way up to the quality of other medals issued from around this time.  From a small collection.  £195

 

WSC-6637:  1746 Scottish Jacobite “Battle of Culloden – Rebellion Defeated” AE Medal.  Medallic Illustration 616/286.  An interesting image of Highlander, hat off, kneeling suppliantly before the crowned lion rampant of England.  It should be noted that these medals were struck quickly after the event and were in no way up to the quality of other medals issued from around this time.  From a small collection.  £225

 

WSC-6638:  1746 Scottish Jacobite “Battle of Culloden – Rebellion Defeated” AE Medal.  Medallic Illustration 617/287.  An interesting image of the English lion overcoming a wolf – the animal most associated with rebellion.  The translated legend reads: "Justice triumphant”.  This medal is listed as VERY RARE in M.I. although this particular example appears to have been modified in order to fit into an oval surround?  It should be noted that these medals were struck quickly after the event and were in no way up to the quality of other medals issued from around this time.  From a small collection.  £125

 

WSC-6639:  1746 Scottish Jacobite “The Failure of Prince Charles” AE Medal.  Medallic Illustration 618/290.  An interesting image of a tiny Prince Charles attempting to snatch the crown from the top of a column, being seized and pulled back by the larger Duke of Cumberland.  The translated legend reads: "Come back again”.  It should be noted that these medals were struck quickly after the event and were in no way up to the quality of other medals issued from around this time.  From a small collection.  £195

 

WSC-6630:  Scottish James V Full 1s, 6d Groat.  Second coinage, 1526 – 1539.  Type III, Edinburgh.  Spink 5380.  A rare denomination and in excellent grade.  £675

 

WTH-6631:  1549 Edward VI Hammered Silver Shilling.  Initial mark Y, bust 5, Southwark mint.  Ex Carlyon-Britton (pre ’63), ex Seaby 1963.  Sold with 1963 ticket.  Hard to photograph so here’s an extra image using a cheap camera phone.  Spink 2266B.  Very good silver content coupled with an excellent portrait and good legends.  £445

 

WJC-6632:  Charles 1st Hammered Silver Half Crown.  Tower mint under king, i.m. Anchor, 1638-9.  Group III (3a2).  Spink 2775.  High grade coin for issue (they were rarely well struck) and presumed a hoard coin.  It is interesting to note that the anchor mark on this coin is sideways on the obverse and vertical on the reverse.  Furthermore, the anchor mark is actually rarer on silver coins than gold.  It is one of the harder initial marks in the second half of the Tower under king issue.  £195

 

WMH-6633:  Henry III Voided Short Cross Medieval Penny.  +RAVL ON SANTAD.  Bury St Edmonds mint town, class 6c (which is the very first coin struck after the death of King John), circa 1216-18.  Spink 1355.  £65

 

WCA-6628:  1686 James II Silver Fourpence.  A short-reigned monarch.  £78

 

WI-6629:  1690 Irish Gun Money Full Crown.  Struck over a large Gun Money half crown.  Nice grade example with the huge benefit of having much host coin still visible, including the sought after date.  The first I’ve ever had and I’m not sure I recall even seeing one with the original date showing through before.  £265

 

WMH-6625:  Richard II Hammered Silver Penny.  York mint.  Class II.  Spink 1691.  Difficult to photograph as the coin has likely been cleaned (or is from a hoard) but really, one of the best grade examples of a R.II penny I’ve seen in an awful long time.  Lord Stewartby states that whilst production of gold throughout the reign remained constant, silver was somewhat erratic and far from prolific – and what you do see is, along with Henry IV coinage, worn and clipped to within an inch of its life.  Rare in this grade.  £245

 

WSC-6626:  1697 Scottish William II Silver 40 Shillings.  A large Scottish silver coin in remarkably good grade for the issue.  Spink 5682 (Spink 2015: £675, £2,250).  Rare in this grade.  £645

 

WSC-6627:  Alexander III Rarer 1st Issue “FRES” Mint Penny.  Long cross & stars, 1250-80.  Type III portrait – Spink 5043 – and the very rare Fres mint.  This is one of the rarest Scottish mints – only Montrose and Wilanerter being rarer.  Montrose actually used this coin's obverse die so there is a strong correlation between the Fres & Montrose mints (see BNJ 1974 and BNJ 1990 60 6).  There were no examples of this coin in the famous Colchester Hoard.  Old Mike Vosper ticket shown here with his old price.  £345

 

WSC-6623:  Scottish Charles 1st Hammered Silver 3 Shillings.  Fourth coinage of 1642.  Spink 5592.  Rare.  £225

 

 

 


This Week’s Listings:

 

WTH-6649:  1574 Elizabeth 1st Hammered Silver Threepence.  Initial mark Eglantine.  Third and fourth issues, Spink 2566.  Very nice grade.  £139

 

WSC-6650:  1677 Scottish Charles II Copper Bawbee or Sixpence.  First date in only a three year issue.  Spink 5628.  Better grade for issue, being about as good as the Spink plate coin.  £75

 

WSC-6651:  1678 Scottish Charles II Copper Bawbee or Sixpence.  Second date in only a three year issue.  Spink 5628.  Better grade for issue, being nearly as good as the Spink plate coin.  £65

 

WSC-6652:  1679 Scottish Charles II Copper Bawbee or Sixpence.  Third and rarest date in only a three year issue.  Spink 5628.  Better grade for issue, being nearly as good as the Spink plate coin.  £65

 

WAu-6653:  Charles 1st Hammered Gold Angel.  Tower mint, initial mark Tun (1636-38).  St Michael spearing a dragon with value in left field; ship with arms on sail.  3.90 grams.  Pierced for use as a touch piece (the coin would have been pre-pierced and suspended on a ribbon for wear around the neck) and thus guaranteed to have been touched by King Charles 1st himself at an official Touching Ceremony to “cure” Scrofula (modern day Tubercularosis).  See THE SOVEREIGN REMEDY – Touch Pieces and the King’s Evil by NOEL WOOLF for further reading.  Sufferers of the disease were invited to attend by strict invitation only - a pass was given which allowed entry.  The King personally gave every sufferer who was invited to attend one of these gold touchpieces.  The theory was that the King touched the gold touchpiece and then personally gave it to the sufferer, so through him God also touched the sufferer.  The touchpieces were purposefully pierced, always in the same position, in order that sufferers could wear them around their necks, next to their skin.  The vast majority of these would have been melted down and the money spent on everyday living, if not by the sufferer, then surely by his or her descendants.  Recipients were not always commoners.  Sold with an old pictorial sales / auction slip.  Catalogued at £2,000 in the 2018 Spink guide.  A rare thing and a definite piece of Royalist history bearing in mind that just a few years after he personally gave this coin to a sufferer, King Charles 1st and his head parted company.  £1,825

 

 

 

New information added to the following listed as of 26th November 2018:

 

WMH-6097:  William “Rufus” II Hammered Silver Norman Penny.  B.M.C. iv (cross pattée and fleury), circa 1095-98.  Spink 1261, North 855.  1.26 grams.  “+NIREPORÐ ON TAM.  Nireworth of Tamworth Tamworth being the ancient capital of Mercia.  Completely unrecorded type for the Tamworth mint.  Completely unrecorded moneyer throughout the entire Norman and Saxon series for any mint town.  An extremely rare mint town for all monarchs, there being only six Norman and four Saxon pennies in total listed on the EMC database for Tamworth (obviously none for Wm II type iv).  The BMC lists three Norman Tamworth pennies for Wm II types i & ii only (moneyers Bruninc & Culinc).  None for type iv.  The Elmore-Jones collection had seven Saxon Tamworth pennies.  He also had both the William II type ii coins mentioned above (Colinc & Bruninc) in the BMC database as well as a William 1st Bonnet type ii (Colinc) which was again the BMC coin.  It just goes to show how good a yardstick the Elmore-Jones collection is because not only are seven Tamworth Saxon pennies unprecedented in a private collection (a number greater than the EMC) but he also managed to get both the BMC Tamworth Wm II pennies (there were only three) as well as a Wm 1st Tamworth penny which was also in the BMC. The anomaly in the photograph (reverse edge, between 6 and 7 o’clock) which looks like a split or crack is in fact a slight double strike that you can’t see without a lens (or this highly detailed image).  The coin is totally problem-free having no cracks, chips or repairs.  It rings as well as any coin when dropped.  A high grade coin with attractive toning.  Sold with several tickets, one of which is a CNG ticket from 2014.  In terms of unique coins, this ticks all the boxes.  Spink have recently (September 2018) sold a William II BMC I Tamworth penny for £12,000 plus 25% commission, so a hefty £15,000.  See here and here.  Buy this coin for zero commission – in fact I’ll take money off!!  £5,700