This week’s fresh listings (scroll down):

 

This page is to be updated every Tuesday and will contain all the latest Coin, Medal & Token listings for that particular week.

 

Additions to www.HistoryInCoins.com for week commencing Tuesday 23rd April 2019

 

 

Previous Weeks’ Listings (scroll down this page for “This Week’s Listings”):

WMH-6708:  Edward III Hammered Silver Groat.  London mint.  Fourth coinage, pre-Treaty period, 1351-61, initial mark Crown so b1356 only.  An interesting mule of a class F obverse and a class G reverse.  Spink 1569 / 1570.  Nice grade.  £185

 

WSC-6710:  High Grade Scottish James III Crux Pellit Copper “Three-Penny Penny”.  1460-88, class III, Spink 5311.  Previously regarded as an Ecclesiastical issue (a Crossraguel of Bishop Kennedy).  Old ticket here.  As good or possibly slightly better than the Spink plate coin (the best extant example they could source to photograph) and as such, choice.  £285

 

WI-6711:  Irish Henry VIII Hammered Silver Groat.  1536-37.  First (1st) Harp Issue, DOMINVS, “hI” by harp representing the king’s third queen, Jane Seymour.  This queen was unusual in not being divorced or beheaded – she died through complications in giving birth to the future Edward VI.  Spink 6473.  £249

 

WMH-6702:  Henry II “Tealby” Hammered Silver Penny.  Bust C, 1163-1167, GOLDHAVOC of Canterbury.  Spink 1339.  Unusually round and well centred for a non Northern mint Tealby issue.  £149

 

WCA-6706:  1683 Charles II Silver Penny.  Nice grade and toned – perhaps not quite to the extent the image suggests.  There is a catastrophic obverse die break which means this coin was one of the very last to come of that particular die.  Spink tells us that 1683 is only ever 1683/1.  I see no trace whatsoever of any underlying figure 1 under the 3 of this coin.  One theory is that the straight 1683 die broke extremely early in the run, resulting in the mint using the old 1681 obverse die, modifying it to a 1683 (ie a 1683/1) for the bulk of 1683.  It’s just a theory though.  Early milled pennies are getting increasingly hard to source.  £75

 

WCA-6694:  1685-88 James II Stuart Gold Touchpiece – guaranteed to have been touched by the king.  This was the official gold coin that the king (James II) personally gave to invited sufferers of Scrofula (TB) at special "Touching Ceremonies".  These ceremonies were performed weekly throughout the year, except on hot days.  The gold touch piece was designed by the famous John Roettier.  This is the first example of a James II gold touchpiece that I have ever seen.  This recent silver gilt on base metal touch piece caught my attention as it passed through a major auction house recently.  It gives an indication of just how collectable these things are.  Read THE SOVEREIGN REMEDY by Noel Woolf for further information.  (E) £1,675

 

WAu-6691:  1701 William II of Scotland Milled Gold Half Pistole.  A single year issue of this excessively rare Scottish gold coin which was current at £6 in Scotland.  Spink 5677.  Both the full and half pistole were struck from gold dust imported by the Darien Co. (The Scottish African Company) from the Central American colony of Darien.  The company asked that its crest, a sun rising from the sea, should be placed on the coinage as an acknowledgement to themselves and to the “Rising Sun”, the ship which had carried the gold.  That emblem is under William II’s bust.  The half pistole is rarer than the full pistole in terms of availability although find either for sale and you’re doing better than nearly everyone else.  £2,950

 

WSC-6689:  Scottish James III Copper Farthing.  IACOBVS D G R with a crown over IR.  Spink 5312.  One of the great rarities in Scottish coinage – rarer than David 1st pennies; rarer even than David 1st pennies in David’s own name!  The Huntarian Museum has no James III farthings at all; the National Museum in Edinburgh also has no farthings.  The Ashmolean has a single James III farthing and although all J.III farthings are very rare, theirs is the trefoil type (Spink 5313) which is not in the same league as crown over IR.  Also, the condition of their example is poor whereas the condition of this coin is very good indeed.  £795

 

 

 


This Week’s Listings:

 

WTH-6712:  1567 Elizabeth 1st Hammered Silver Sixpence.  3rd & 4th issues, initial mark Coronet.  The Coronet i.m. ran from 1st July 1567 to 28th February 1570, meaning this coin had a 6 month run only.  Some tooling marks, which are not really visible in the hand (I didn’t notice them when I bought the coin), otherwise very nice grade indeed.  Spink 2562.  1567 as a date represents a frequency of 6.6% for the 2,716 recorded single finds of Elizabeth 1st coins and 4.8% for all 5,588 recorded Elizabeth 1st hoard coins.  £125

 

WTH-6713:  1589 Elizabeth 1st Hammered Silver Sixpence.  Initial mark Crescent, sixth issue.  Spink 2578A.  1589 as a date represents a frequency of 0.5% for the 2,716 recorded single finds of Elizabeth 1st coins and 0.5% for all 5,588 recorded Elizabeth 1st hoard coins.  1589 is the seventh rarest of all forty two dates.  £135

 

WSC-6714:  1697 Scottish Jacobite Medal  The sun rising over a calm sea – the young Price being the sun and the calm sea being the world.  MI 194(ii) / 503.  Fortunes of Prince James, the Old Pretender, copper medallion dated 1697: advocating James (III) to be the English and Scottish monarch and for the incumbent, William III (William II of Scotland), to be removed.  These were produced by the old James II of England (James VII of Scotland) - James had been forced to abdicate the English throne in 1688 and live an exiled life in France from 1690 (any enemy of England was a friend of France!) - for distribution amongst the partisans of the Stuarts, most of which seemed to be in London at the time.  Indeed, two hoards of these highly symbolic medals from the small series were unearthed in Smithfield and Clement's Lane, Lombard Street in 1865.  Previously, the exiled James had sought to have his cause (namely his son, James, be placed upon the English and Scottish thrones and for William III be removed) and himself represented at the Treaty of Ryswick.  Deposing an incumbent monarch from such a royal seat, James's problematic devotion to Catholicism, and bizarrely, Louis XIV's outright rejection of James's claim, meant that this was never going to happen and indeed, the effort proved fruitless and the peace was signed, recognising William III's claim to the throne.  Contrary to what some people state, these medals were not issued to the delegates from the countries signing the Peace Treaty at Ryswick in the Netherlands in September 1697, they were simply a device to keep the cause alive, even though everyone knew the cause was dead.  £125

 

WSC-6715:  1697 Scottish Jacobite Medal  A dove holding an olive branch – the young Price being the dove, offering peace to the world.  MI 195(ii) / 504.  Fortunes of Prince James, the Old Pretender, copper medallion dated 1697: advocating James (III) to be the English and Scottish monarch and for the incumbent, William III (William II of Scotland), to be removed.  These were produced by the old James II of England (James VII of Scotland) - James had been forced to abdicate the English throne in 1688 and live an exiled life in France from 1690 (any enemy of England was a friend of France!) - for distribution amongst the partisans of the Stuarts, most of which seemed to be in London at the time.  Indeed, two hoards of these highly symbolic medals from the small series were unearthed in Smithfield and Clement's Lane, Lombard Street in 1865.  Previously, the exiled James had sought to have his cause (namely his son, James, be placed upon the English and Scottish thrones and for William III be removed) and himself represented at the Treaty of Ryswick.  Deposing an incumbent monarch from such a royal seat, James's problematic devotion to Catholicism, and bizarrely, Louis XIV's outright rejection of James's claim, meant that this was never going to happen and indeed, the effort proved fruitless and the peace was signed, recognising William III's claim to the throne.  Contrary to what some people state, these medals were not issued to the delegates from the countries signing the Peace Treaty at Ryswick in the Netherlands in September 1697, they were simply a device to keep the cause alive, even though everyone knew the cause was dead.  £125