This week’s fresh listings (scroll down):

 

This page is to be updated every Tuesday and will contain all the latest Coin, Medal & Token listings for that particular week.

 

Additions to www.HistoryInCoins.com for week commencing Tuesday 14th June 2021

 

 

Previous Weeks’ Listings (scroll down this page for “This Week’s Listings”):

 

WTH-7113:  1567 Elizabeth 1st Milled or Machine Pressed “Eloye Mestrelle” Silver Sixpence.  Coins of exceedingly fine workmanship were produced at the start of the reign in a screw press introduced by the Frenchman, Eloye Mestrelle.  Parts of the machinery were powered by a horse-drawn mill and thus the coins became known as “Mill Money”.  Mestrelle was hanged in 1578!  Spink 2599.  Initial mark Lis and the much rarer, later date of 1567.  £395

 

WTH-7114:  1567-70 Elizabeth 1st Hammered Silver Halfgroat.  Third & Fourth issue, Spink 2567.  Remarkably full flan and an impressive 0.93 grams.  I don’t actually recall seeing a halfgroat as good as this, at least not for awhile.  You often see high grade pennies, fractions and even threepences but the halfgroat invariably turns up looking very much the worse for wear.  £185

 

WJC-7115:  Charles 1st 1639-40 Hammered Silver Shilling.  Tower mint, initial mint Triangle-in-Circle, type 4:4, Spink 2799.  Ex North York Moors’ collection.  £185

 

WJC-7116:  Charles 1st Provincial Aberystwyth Mint Hammered Silver Shilling.  Initial mark Book – Aberystwyth mint, 1638/9-42.  Spink 2883. The mint at Aberystwyth had its beginnings in July 1637 when Thomas Bushell had the idea of coining at the source rather than sending the mined silver for coining to London.  He petitioned that it would stimulate the Welsh mining industry with predictions of increased output if the adits to drain water from the mines reached their capacity, and suggested it could lead to other mines in England being used for coining in a similar fashion. The Mint in London was against the idea, but King Charles asked for Bushell to visit and was persuaded by his charm to back him. The agreement was to set up a mint in Aberystwyth Castle with the Crown taking a 10% share with overall supervision from the Warden of the Mint, Sir William Parkhurst. Coins were struck at 0.925 fineness with Welsh plumes at Halfcrown, Shilling, Sixpence, Half-Groat and Penny.  Ex Arthur M Fitts III collection, ex Lepczyk collection.  Sold with an auction printout as well as a collector’s cabinet ticket.  Toned, slightly double struck.  £625

 

WJC-7117:  1609 James 1st Rare Date Hammered Silver Sixpence.  Second coinage, initial mark Key, 4th bust.  The key mark is sought after but the date trumps that.  It is the rarest of all the single digit dates as well as being rarer than 21, 22, 23 and 24.  Spink 2658 – of all the coins listed by Spink, I’d suggest that Spink 2658 is the one that needs further work.  For example, the date range within Spink 2658 is 1605 through to 1616, where 1605 is common and 1612 & 1614 have only one or two extent examples each.  In fact, 1612 & 1614 (rated by Spink at £250) are rarer than 1618, which Spink rate at £2,500!  Sold with an impressively comprehensive information slip.  A rare coin.  £385

 

WI-7118:  Irish King John Medieval Hammered Silver Penny.  Third “Rex” coinage, 1208/9-1211/12.  +ROBERD.ON.DIVE – Dublin mint.  Spink 6228.  The attractive reverse, unique to this issue, is the sun, moon and three stars, all in a triangle.  £195

 

WSC-7119:  1745 Scottish Jacobite Rebellion AE Medal.  Struck to commemorate the re-taking of Carlisle.  Medallic Illustrations (ii) 605/261.  Prince Charles and his army advanced into England as far as Derby where, upon full consideration of the dangers which threatened them, they commenced their retreat, making no stand until they were over the border.  The Jacobites left a small garrison at Carlisle, which, after a small show of resistance, surrendered to the Duke of Cumberland.  This medal depicts the Duke as a Roman warrior defeating the Hydra of Rebellion with Carlisle in the distance.  £155

 

WSC-7120:  1745 Scottish Jacobite Rebellion Silver Medal.  Struck to commemorate the re-taking of Carlisle after the Duke had returned to London.  Medallic Illustrations (ii) 606/264.  Prince Charles and his army advanced into England as far as Derby where, upon full consideration of the dangers which threatened them, they commenced their retreat, making no stand until they were over the border.  The Jacobites left a small garrison at Carlisle, which, after a small show of resistance, surrendered to the Duke of Cumberland.  This medal depicts the Duke, trampling on a Scottish soldier, comforting Anglia, who is accompanied by the emblems of Religion & Liberty.  Listed Rare.  £395

 

WSC-7121:  1745 Scottish Jacobite Rebellion Silver Medal.  Struck to commemorate the re-taking of Carlisle after the Duke had returned to London.  Medallic Illustrations (ii) 607/265.  Prince Charles and his army advanced into England as far as Derby where, upon full consideration of the dangers which threatened them, they commenced their retreat, making no stand until they were over the border.  The Jacobites left a small garrison at Carlisle, which, after a small show of resistance, surrendered to the Duke of Cumberland.  This medal depicts the mighty English Lion overcoming the weak Wolf with the legend “Justice Triumphant” – a retort against Prince Charles who had inscribed his standrard, perhaps prematurely, “Tandem Triumphans”: Triumphant at last.  Listed Rare.  £295

 

WSC-7122:  1746 Scottish Jacobite Rebellion AE Medal.  Struck to commemorate the famous Battle of Culloden.  Medallic Illustrations (ii) 612/277.  Following on from the success at Carlisle, the Duke of Cumberland marched over the border on the 12th April, 1746, and entered Nairn.  Two days later the Duke’s army marched out to attack Prince Charles’ army on Culloden Moor.  Although the Highlanders initially attacked bravely, they were quickly defeated by a cunning attack from the rear by General Bland.  Those still living, and able, fled in disarray.  Indeed, so rapid was the defeat that the famous Scottish novelist, Tobias Smollett, in his most famous poem, “The Tears of Scotland”, said: “In one short hour, all the Prince’s hopes vanished and he rebellion was entirely extinguished”.  £165

 

WSC-7123:  1746 Scottish Jacobite Rebellion AE Medal.  Struck to commemorate the famous Battle of Culloden.  Medallic Illustrations (ii) 616/286.  Following on from the success at Carlisle, the Duke of Cumberland marched over the border on the 12th April, 1746, and entered Nairn.  Two days later the Duke’s army marched out to attack Prince Charles’ army on Culloden Moor.  Although the Highlanders initially attacked bravely, they were quickly defeated by a cunning attack from the rear by General Bland.  Those still living, and able, fled in disarray.  Indeed, so rapid was the defeat that the famous Scottish novelist, Tobias Smollett, in his most famous poem, “The Tears of Scotland”, said: “In one short hour, all the Prince’s hopes vanished and the rebellion was entirely extinguished”.  This medal depicts a suppliant Highlander kneeling before the mighty, victorious English Lion.  Remarkably good grade for one of these.  £195

 

                                                                                                                                                                      


This Week’s Listings

 

 

WMH-7124:  William 1st”Norman Kings” Hammered Silver Rare Mint Penny.  + GODRIC ON LEHRE – rarer Leicester mint town.  B.M.C. 8 – PAXS type, Spink 1257.  Sold with a cabinet ticket together with a detailed printout.  Leicester is a hard to find mint for virtually all Norman coinage.  £1,095

 

WTH-7125:  1550 Edward VI Hammered Silver Shilling.  Struck at the Tower of London mint in 1550 (dated MDL, which is a rarer date) with the initial mark Martlet, which again is a much rarer mark.  Crowned bust 5.  5.66g, Spink 2466.  Nicely toned, albeit with the usual flat strike areas, with clear date and initial marks.  Sold with a detailed information slip and an annotated collector’s paper coin envelope.  A rare coin.  £425

 

WI-7126:  1682 Irish-American St Patrick Copper Farthing.  Brass anti counterfeiting plug very much in situ with excellent detail both sides.  No damage or repairs.  Spink 6569.  Struck on a large flan (25mm diameter).  This is possibly the best grade example I have ever handled.  Collectors of this issue will be aware that they were struck in Dublin on soft metal and that virtually all extant examples, and there aren’t really that many in total, are grim in the extreme.  A rare and desirable coin in any grade but clearly much more so this coin.  £785