This week’s fresh listings:

 

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Additions to www.HistoryInCoins.com for week commencing Tuesday 20th February 2024

 

 

 

This week's fresh listings:

 

 

WSC-7982:  James II Scottish Hammered Silver Penny.  First coinage, Billion silver issue (all James II pennies are from this issue), second issue, Edinburgh mint.  This is a rarer mule - a type Bi obverse with a clear initial mark Crown coupled with a type Biii reverse with saltires alongside the trefoil of pellets in the angles.  Spink 5251 / 5251B.  For clarification, the obverse to type Biii has initial mark Lis.  The old tickets don't reflect this muling of the dies because I assume the referencing system has only recently been updated.  The main image is appalling, even by my low standards, so here's one taken with a camera phone which clearly shows the obverse initial mark Crown - see here.  James II groats and halfgroats were designed to come into line with their English counterparts, at least that was the intention for the second coinage.  The Scottish did such a good job that the new groats did indeed look like English groats and were the same weight and had the same silver content as the English groats but unfortunately were valued at twelve pence in Scotland whereas the corresponding English groats were valued at four pence in England.  This produced serious consequences for the penny, especially as it was billion (and, in the spirit of not learning lessons, continued to be billon under James III), which ultimately had very little spending power, north or south of the border.  This is a very poor issue, as you'd expect with the billon nature of the silver content.  However, even though this is a rare denomination with very few extant examples, this coin is high grade for issue with all details / devices clear, as well as the bulk of the legends.  In a period where monarchs rarely ran the full course of their lives, James II met his maker in 1460 in one of the more unusual ways - during the siege of Roxburgh Castle, a canon next to the king accidentally blew up, terminating both cannon and king.  A very rare coin indeed with excellent provenance, the interesting muling and in high grade for issue.  £645

 

WSC-7983:  1687 James VII Scottish Silver Ten Shillings.  Single pellet either side of the date and either side of the 10 below bust.  The reverse depicting St Andrew's cross with national emblems.  Spink 5641.  A very short issue - just three years - due to James being trounced by William of Orange at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690.  He lived out the rest of his days in exile in France, dying in 1701.  Graded XF40 (extremely fine 40) which in reality is actually a straight VF obverse, GVF reverse.  Incidentally, this coin is the third highest graded example of this date recorded on the NGC database.  Should collectors wish to disassociate coin from slab, I'm told it is a very quick, easy and most gratifying process.  £995

 

WSax-7984:  Choice, High Grade Anglo-Saxon Silver Sceatta.  Regal issue, Eadberht, 737-58.  York mint.  Obv: E◊TBERHTVΓ around a central small cross pattee, rev: Stylised quadreped (stag), left.  Chapman 48 (same dies), North 178, Spink 847.  Lightly toned and EF rather than the ascribed GVF on the accompanying ticket.  An outstanding example of this desirable and iconic Saxon silver coin.  Find better!  £695

 

WSax-7985:  Aethelred II Late Saxon Hammered Silver Penny - Rare Mint.  B.M.C. IVa, voided long cross type, AD 997-1003.  +AELFS TAN N MO LEIG - moneyer Aelfstan working out of the Leicester mint town.  A rare mint and an even rarer moneyer with no examples of Aelfstan being recorded for Aethelred II B.M.C. IVa on the excellent EMC database.  Good provenance, being ex Steve Green collection, ex A.William collection (acquired Spink, 2019), ex Spink Numismatic Circular 1997.  Rare.  £675

 

WSax-7986:  Aethelred II Late Saxon Hammered Silver Penny - Rare Mint.  B.M.C. IVa, voided long cross type, AD 997-1003.  +VLE GET MO L IHFR - moneyer Wulfgeat working out of the Leicester mint town.  A rare mint and an even rarer moneyer with only a single example of Wulfgeat being recorded for Aethelred II B.M.C. IVa on the excellent EMC database.  Good provenance, being ex Steve Green collection, ex A.William collection (acquired CNG 2020), ex Spink (2014), ex Baldwin's (2007).  Rare.  £665

 

WSax-7987:  Aethelred II Late Saxon Hammered Silver Penny - Rarer Mint.  B.M.C. IVa, voided long cross type, AD 997-1003.  +AEL FRIC MO N VNT - moneyer Aelfric working out of the Huntingdon mint town.  Good provenance, being ex Steve Green collection, ex Dr J. Hulett (acquired DNW 2017).  Rare.  £495

 

WSax-7988:  Harold II Very Late Saxon Hammered Silver Penny - Better Mint.  B.M.C. I, PAXS (peace) type, 5th January 1066 – 14th October 1066 only with the end of the reign coming on the battlefield at the famous Battle of Hastings.  Obverse crowned bust, left, sceptre before, +HAROLD REX AN; reverse PAX in a central tablet, +AELFGEAT ON LINCOL – moneyer Wulfgeat struck at the Lincoln mint.  An extremely healthy 1.33g with 10h die rotation.  Hild type A, Spink 1186, North 836.  The 14th October 1066, witnessed the fall of the Saxon period and the dawn of the Norman period in England.  Although created by the victors, the Bayous Tapestry is said to be somewhat representative of the battle: commissioned by Bishop Odo, William the Conqueror's half-brother, the Tapestry tells the story of the events surrounding the conquest of England by the Duke of Normandy, including the famous arrow (spoiler alert: there was no arrow in the eye until the nineteenth century restorers put it there and further, the recipient of said nineteenth century arrow wasn’t even Harold Godwinson).  Lincoln is a rarer Saxon mint, situated up on the left of Steep Hill and, I believe, the building is still there, or at least remnants of it?  In terms of the obverse legend ending, the much abbreviated ANGLO, represented on this die by simply "AN", is very rare.  The famous Braintree Hoard of late Anglo-Saxon pennies was 122 in total.  Of those, most were the unabbreviated version - ANGLO.  Of that hoard, only x8 terminated in "AN": x3 London mint (many more London mints were the usual longer reading), x3 Maldon mint (there were only x3 Maldon mint coins in the hoard), a single Stamford and a single Wilton mint.  Again, Stamford and Wilton were represented by more coins but these all had the longer version.  Crucially, the two Lincoln pennies in that hoard were both ANGL.  Toned VF - a very handsome and imposing coin.  Finally, there were x3 Maldon mint coins in the Braintree Hoard and only x2 Lincoln.  Maldon is so rare a mint as to have zero examples so far recorded on the EMC database!  This coin toned and VF.  A very handsome, imposing, rare and desirable coin.  £6,850