This week’s fresh listings:

 

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Additions to www.HistoryInCoins.com for week commencing Tuesday 16th April 2024

 

 

 

This week's fresh listings:

 

 

WSax-8041:  Aethelred II Late Saxon Hammered Silver Penny.  B.M.C. IIIa - CRVX type (991-97), +EADMVND M`O LVN.  Spink 1148.  London mint.  The Unready, or more accurately, the Unrede, deriving from the fact that Aethelred had very little council that he could rely upon from his government - he inherited the thrown upon the murder of his half-brother and was considered a weak leader virtually from the outset.  This was the period where vast (and I do literally mean vast) quantities of silver coinage were paid to Viking raiders in attempt to stop them.  Danegeld was the tax levied upon the populace in order to raise the "tribute" payments.  Large hoards have been found in Scandinavia where the payments were taken home and deposited in the Bank-of-Mother-Earth.  A very nice grade coin indeed.  £435

 

WSax-8042:  Aethelred II Late Saxon Hammered Silver Penny.  B.M.C. IVa - Voided Long Cross type (997 - 1003), +AEŠELNOŠ M`O LINC.  Spink 1151.  Moneyer Aethelnoth at the Lincoln mint.  The Unready, or more accurately, the Unrede, deriving from the fact that Aethelred had very little council that he could rely upon from his government - he inherited the thrown upon the murder of his half-brother and was considered a weak leader virtually from the outset.  This was the period where vast (and I do literally mean vast) quantities of silver coinage were paid to Viking raiders in attempt to stop them doing what Vikings did.  Danegeld was the tax levied upon the populace in order to raise the "tribute" payments.  Large hoards have been found in Scandinavia where the payments were taken home and deposited in the Bank-of-Mother-Earth.  Peck marks on the reverse strongly indication that this was part of the Danegeld.  £375

 

WSax-8043:  Cnut Late Saxon Hammered Silver Penny.  B.M.C. VIII - Quatrefoil type (1017 - 1023), +CETEL O EOFRR.  Spink 1157.  York mint.  Following on from Danegeld under Aethelred, Cnut was actually the son of King Swein of Denmark - a Viking and a Viking of some repute.  In 1014 the Danish fleet proclaimed Cnut king of England but the natives thought otherwise and he was forced to leave.  Interestingly, this shows Aethelred as not a subservient and weak monarch; rather a decisive, fighting monarch.  Perhaps the potential loss of his thrown was a bridge too far?!  Aethelred's son, Eadmund Ironside, continued the defiance towards the Vikings but upon his death on 1016, Cnut became undisputed king of England , a position which Cnut firmly consolidated a year later by marrying Emma of Normandy, Aethelred's widow.  History suggests that Emma and Cnut's marriage, though begun as a political strategy, became an affectionate affair. During their marriage, Emma and Cnut had a son, Harthacnut, and a daughter, Gunhilda.  A very nice grade coin indeed.  £445

 

WSax-8044:  Cnut Late Saxon Hammered Silver Penny.  B.M.C. XV - Voided Short Cross type (1029 - 1035/6), +ELFSIGE ON LENC.  Spink 1159.  Chester mint.  Following on from Danegeld under Aethelred, Cnut was actually the son of King Swein of Denmark - a Viking and a Viking of some repute.  In 1014 the Danish fleet proclaimed Cnut king of England but the natives thought otherwise and he was forced to leave.  Interestingly, this shows Aethelred as not a subservient and weak monarch; rather a decisive, fighting monarch.  Perhaps the potential loss of his thrown was a bridge too far?!  Aethelred's son, Eadmund Ironside, continued the defiance towards the Vikings but upon his death on 1016, Cnut became undisputed king of England , a position which Cnut firmly consolidated a year later by marrying Emma of Normandy, Aethelred's widow.  History suggests that Emma and Cnut's marriage, though begun as a political strategy, became an affectionate affair. During their marriage, Emma and Cnut had a son, Harthacnut, and a daughter, Gunhilda.  I've managed to once again murder the quality of the coin through my non-existent photographic skills and complete ineptitude at using a so-called hi spec camera, so I've included a cheap camera phone image taken in not the best of lighting, which actually is much more representative.  Rarer mint town.  £435

 

WSax-8045:  Edward The Confessor Late Saxon Hammered Silver Penny.  B.M.C. VII - Pointed Helmet type (1053 - 1056), +DVLINNOŠ ON LENC.  Spink 1179.  Chester mint with Dulinnoth an apparently unrecorded moneyer.  Edward was the son of Aethelred II and Emma of Norway so Cnut was Edward's step father; Cnut having sent Edward to live in Normandy under the tutelage of her brother during Cnut's lifetime - some 25 years.  Edward was know as "Confessor" due to his extreme piety, although the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle portrayed him not as a saint but as a strong king.  Interestingly, the perhaps biased Anglo-Saxon Chronicles aside, he was remembered through history as a devout weakling; too obsessed with the matters of the spirit to cope with the real world. This was probably because his death led directly to the Conquest and to the fact that, despite being married to one of the most beautiful women in the country, he had no children by her.  An unusual striking crack, following the king's profile, which has raised the surface by a fraction of a millimetre, and shows through on the reverse.  The image makes this feature much more obvious than it really is.  An imposing coin from a rarer mint town and an unrecorded moneyer.  £455

 

WSax-8046:  Edward The Confessor Late Saxon Hammered Silver Penny.  B.M.C. IX - Sovereign / Eagles type (1056 - 1059), +BRVNGAR ON LVNDEF.  Spink 1181.  London mint, which is different to the usual York mint Sovereign / Eagles that you see.  Edward was the son of Aethelred II and Emma of Norway so Cnut was Edward's step father; Cnut having sent Edward to live in Normandy under the tutelage of Emma's brother during Cnut's lifetime - some 25 years.  Edward was know as "Confessor" due to his extreme piety, although the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle portrayed him not as a saint but as a strong king.  Interestingly, the perhaps biased Anglo-Saxon Chronicles aside, he was remembered through history as a devout weakling; too obsessed with the matters of the spirit to cope with the real world. This was probably because his death led directly to the Conquest and to the fact that, despite being married to one of the most beautiful women in the country, he had no children by her.  An interesting feature of the reverse is the coin-shaped semicircle, indicating that this coin has possibly been in contact with another coin for a lengthy period of time.  +BRVNGAR ON LVNDEF is an unrecorded moneyer for B.M.C. IX on the excellent EMC database, there being only x13 coins in total recorded: x8 PACX, x2 Small Cross and x3 Pointed Helmet types.  No Sovereign / Eagles type at all for this moneyer.  This single coin now extends the length of time Brungar was active at the mint by further three years.  A rare coin.  £895