Scottish Coins & Tokens

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Scottish Jacobite & Earlier Medals

 

WSC-6929:  James Francis Edward Stuart / James III of Scotland Silver Touch Piece.  See the excellent “The Sovereign Remedy” by Noel Woolf (ISBN 0 901603 01 5) for everything you need to know about touchpieces and the Kings & Queens that personally handed them out.  The would-be James III of England or James VIII of Scotland was in exile in Italy immediately following his second unsuccessful invasion of Scotland in 1715.  It was while in exile in the Palazzo del Re, Rome (courtesy of the pope) that he had these silver touch pieces made for both his English and Scottish supporters.  This example is very much an Italian commission due to the IAC.III obverse legend, as opposed to the French commissioned English IAC 3 and Scottish IAC 8 reverse legends.  James gave them out in very tiny quantities during special Touching Ceremonies where, because he was in direct contact with God, he had the power to cure Scofula (TB).  Or so he believed.  This one is from a collection dating back to the 1880's – see tickets.  This image here, from an auction just last year, illustrates  just how rare these Scottish pieces are (and how bad the auction house was at estimating value!) - they were produced in such tiny quantities and very few survived.  Guaranteed to have been personally touched by James when he gave this out to a Scrofula sufferer at one of the ceremonies.  This is a piece of Scottish and English (but mainly Scottish!!) history.  £1,475

 

WSC-7392:  1697 Scottish Jacobite Medal – The Treaty of Ryswick.  Issued by the Stuarts, as part of a series, and likely intended for distribution in London to partisans of the Stuarts, so basically early propaganda pieces.  The son of James II was chosen in preference to his father, presumably to show succession and therefore legitimacy of the cause.  M.I. (ii)195/504 and listed as Rare.  Ex Bernard Paul collection, ex Spink.  £185

 

WSC-7203:  1699 Scottish Silver Jacobite Medal.  Prince James Edward Francis Stuart, 1688 – 1766.  A medal designed by Roettier and distributed among Jacobite followers, predominantly outside of Scotland, to gather support for Prince James (The Old Pretender) to be crowned James III of England and Ireland and James VIII of Scotland.  MI (ii)204/519, Eimer 381.  Sold with an old (2004?) ticket together with a more recent auction information slip.  The rising sun is typical of the symbolism used by the Jacobites; it represents the sun dispersing demons – a new dawn.  £325

 

WSC-7688:  1731 Scottish Jacobite Medal – Bonnie Prince Charlie.  A large medal (crown sized) in base metal showing “The Legitimacy of the Jacobite Succession”, through the children of James III: Charles the Young Pretender and Prince Henry.  From a very old collection; Hugo Harpur-Crew of Calke Abbey in Derbyshire.  The Harpurs were Baronets.  I am unable to ascertain if the Harpurs had any links to the Jacobite cause.  A silver example of this medal sold for over £1,000 after commissions.  Eimer 521.  An interesting medal.  £345

 

WSC-7120:  1745 Scottish Jacobite Rebellion Silver Medal.  Struck to commemorate the re-taking of Carlisle after the Duke had returned to London.  Medallic Illustrations (ii) 606/264.  Prince Charles and his army advanced into England as far as Derby where, upon full consideration of the dangers which threatened them, they commenced their retreat, making no stand until they were over the border.  The Jacobites left a small garrison at Carlisle, which, after a small show of resistance, surrendered to the Duke of Cumberland.  This medal depicts the Duke, (affectionately known as "Butcher Cumberland" through his actions during the Jacobite risings of 1745 and particularly 1746) trampling on a Scottish soldier, comforting Anglia, who is accompanied by the emblems of Religion & Liberty.  Listed Rare.  £395

 

WSC-7121:  1745 Scottish Jacobite Rebellion Silver Medal.  Struck to commemorate the re-taking of Carlisle after the Duke (affectionately known as "Butcher Cumberland" through his actions during the Jacobite risings of 1745 and particularly 1746) had returned to London.  Medallic Illustrations (ii) 607/265.  Prince Charles and his army advanced into England as far as Derby where, upon full consideration of the dangers which threatened them, they commenced their retreat, making no stand until they were over the border.  The Jacobites left a small garrison at Carlisle, which, after a small show of resistance, surrendered to the Duke of Cumberland.  This medal depicts the mighty English Lion overcoming the weak Wolf with the legend “Justice Triumphant” – a retort against Prince Charles who had inscribed his standrard, perhaps prematurely, “Tandem Triumphans”: Triumphant at last.  Listed Rare.  £365

 

WSC-7537:  1745 Scottish Jacobite Silver Medal.  Carlisle is recaptured, under the command of the Duke of Cumberland (affectionately known as "Butcher Cumberland" through his actions during the Jacobite risings of 1745 and particularly 1746), and the Jacobite rebels retreat back to Scotland.  A medium silver medal being 34mm diameter – similar to a contemporary halfcrown.  Eimer 598, Medallic Illustrations (ii) 606/264.  Toned VF and ex Spink.  £395

 

WSC-7693:  1745 Scottish Silver Jacobite Medal – “REBELS RETREAT TO SCOTLAND”.  William, Duke of Cumberland (affectionately known as "Butcher Cumberland" through his actions during the Jacobite risings of 1745 and particularly 1746) taking on the rebels and forcing them to retreat back whence they came, thereby recapturing Carlisle.  Medallic Illustrations (ii) 607/265.  In the absence of social media, very much a propaganda medal of its time.  For some bazaar reason, someone’s decided to pay a not inconsequential sum to have this medal slabbed by NGC.  For that, they were told the medal was VF, although with obverse scratches to the fields, and they got a plastic capsule which I’ll wager will be broken open and put in the bin sometime in the next few years.  The medal is indeed about VF – NGC mistakenly took the flat high points as wear.  If they’d known this was not the case, the medal would be XF 40 or something along those lines.  As already mentioned, this was simply a means of getting a message out to the public, which is why it’s surprising that they bothered to use silver.  It was like today’s government charging us a fee to watch a Party Political Message, pre election!  A nice piece of Scottish Jacobite history (and these slabs do come away fairly easily!)  £425

 

WJC-7922:  1745 Large Scottish Jacobite Medal.  Struck to commemorate the re-taking of Carlisle after the Duke had returned to London.  Medallic Illustrations (ii) 608/268.  Prince Charles and his army advanced into England as far as Derby where, upon full consideration of the dangers which threatened them, they commenced their retreat, making no stand until they were over the border.  The Jacobites left a small garrison at Carlisle, which, after a small show of resistance, surrendered to the Duke of Cumberland.  This medal depicts the Duke of Cumberland (affectionately known as "Butcher Cumberland" through his actions during the Jacobite risings of 1745 and particularly 1746) presenting to his father, George II, the emblems of the town from which he had driven the rebels.  There was no love lost between these two which is one reason why when George II died, his grandson became George III.  High grade and with the iconic die break which all medals have from this specific issue.  Listed in Medallic Illustrations as Rare.  £345

 

WSC-7855:  Choice 1746 Scottish Jacobite Medal - The Hanging of the Rebels!  The Battle of Culloden.  Medallic Illustrations 618(ii)/289.  Depicting a Jacobite rebel literally being hanged by the Duke of Cumberland's men, together with two others, suppliant, awaiting the same fate.  Medals of this period were all about propaganda or getting the message out there to the masses - they were the 18th century equivalent of Twitter.  There were many such executions of Jacobite supporters carried out immediately following this famous battle (and countless others beside), as well as terrible punishments metered out - this medal was aimed at both warning off any future Jacobite support as well as reassuring the English that all was being most effectively taken care of regarding those pesky Jacobites.  It may interest you to know that literally the day after the Battle of Culloden, such was the public interest, a Cumberland Society was formed.  Medals were issued in gold, silver and base with the stipulation being that the number of gold medals must not exceed the Duke's age.  He was 25.  A Cumberland Society gold medal sold in 1897, from the Montagu collection, at Sotherby's for a record price of £225.  The same medal sold again in 1904 for £238 which was another record price.  Even today, the Battle of Culloden will be familiar to most people.  In terms of this actual Battle of Culloden medal, it is part of a series of approximately twelve which commemorate the Duke of Cumberland's victory at Culloden.  This particular medal was, to quote Medallic Illustrations, "...badly executed", similar to the Pinchbeck medals (a Georgian toy manufacturer who took it upon himself to issue Jacobite and Porto Bello medals).  Both issues really are generally poor in die, execution and longevity.  This particular medal flies in the face of the others, being choice.  It's virtually as struck (the flat areas are courtesy of the dies), but also of a quality strike and, importantly, from dies extremely early on in their life.  You'll not see one better so don't miss out on this one.  £465

 

WSC-7730:  1746 Scottish Jacobite Rebellion Medal – The Rebels Defeated.  The Battle of Culloden was the final confrontation of the Jacobite rising of 1745. On 16 April 1746, the Jacobite army of Charles Edward Stuart, the Young Pretender, was decisively defeated by a British government force under Prince William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland (affectionately known as "Butcher Cumberland" through his actions during the Jacobite risings of 1745 and particularly 1746), on Drummossie Moor near Inverness in the Scottish Highlands.  MI(ii)616/286, Eimer 609.  Full of symbolism; the medal depicts a Highlander, hat off, kneeling suppliantly before the crowned lion of England.  We perhaps think of the Battle of Culloden as a chivalrous, gentlemanly sojourn with handshakes afterwards.  It was actually the antithesis of that, and worse: the English, after the battle, visited devastation and atrocities upon the glens of unimaginable magnitude with rebels, rebel supporters and innocent men, women and children alike all treated the same under the red mist of “victory”.  A nice grade, brass medal from an important period of British history.  £245

 

WSC-7746:  1746 Scottish Jacobite Large Medal – The Battle of Culloden.  An impressive large medal commemorating the famous battle from the victor’s perspective.  These were basically the Facebook of the day – propaganda for the people.  The message was delivered via symbolism rather than words, as was the way then – Hercules tramples on Discord.  The Battle of Culloden was the final confrontation of the Jacobite rising of 1745. On 16 April 1746, the Jacobite army of Charles Edward Stuart, the Young Pretender, was decisively defeated by a British government force under Prince William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland (affectionately known as "Butcher Cumberland" through his actions during the Jacobite risings of 1745 and particularly 1746), on Drummossie Moor near Inverness in the Scottish Highlands.  MI(ii)613/278, Eimer 604.  We perhaps think of the Battle of Culloden as a chivalrous, gentlemanly sojourn with handshakes afterwards.  It was actually the antithesis of that, and worse: the English, after the battle, visited devastation and atrocities upon the glens of unimaginable magnitude with rebels, rebel supporters and innocent men, women and children alike all treated the same under the red mist of “victory”.  Nice grade.  £295

 

 

 

Hammered Gold & Silver Coinage

 

David 1st

 

 

 

Prince Henry, Earl of Northumberland & Huntingdon

 

WSC-7916:  Scottish Prince Henry Hammered Silver Cut Halfpenny - Excessively Rare ERL Variety.  Period A so circa 1139 - mid 1140's.  Obverse: [hEN]RIC ERL - as Stephen's Watford B.M.C. 1 type but having the extremely rare legend variety.  I am unable to find any extant examples in any of the major collections I have reference books to (Scottish National, Hunterian, Glasgow, Ashmolen etc museums).  Reverse: [+EREBA]LD : ON : C[OLEB] which is the Corbridge mint.  Spink 5011.  I haven't seen a Prince Henry offered for sale since the last (and only other) one I sold, which was a decade or two ago now.  A very rare offering indeed.  £1,675

 

 

 

William 1st

 

Short Cross & Stars “PHASE A” coinage, circa 1195-1205

 

WSC-7282:  William 1st “The Lion” Scottish Medieval Penny.  Short cross & stars coinage of 1195 – 1205.  Spink 5027.  +RAVL ON ROCEB – rarer Roxburgh mint.   The Sylloge of Coins of the British Isles (#35 – Scottish coins in the Ashmolean & Hunterian Museums) lists only three examples from Roxburgh, none of which are in the Hunterian Museum in Glasgow!  £285

 

WSC-7970:  William 1st Scottish Medieval Hammered Silver Penny.  Phase A, Short cross & stars coinage of 1195 – 1205.  Spink 5027.  +hVE ON EDNEBVR – Edinburgh mint.   In the recent auction of the "Property of a Gentleman"  - a collection of Scottish coins, there was only a single Phase A represented in the entire sale.  The Sylloge of Coins of the British Isles (#35 – Scottish coins in the Ashmolean & Hunterian Museums) lists only two examples from Edinburgh, one in the Hunterian Museum in Glasgow, the other in the Ashmolean Museum.  It is generally assumed that the introduction of the Short Cross coinage dates from 1195 because of a reference in the contemporary Melrose Chronicle, although this is a full fifteen years after the changeover in England. Roxburgh was the most important mint at this period, with Raul responsible for more than half the entire production of Phase A.  Edinburgh is the rarest of the three Phase A mint towns with this mint and moneyer being but a fraction of the total output.  £485

 

 

 

Short Cross & Stars “PHASE B” coinage, circa 1205-1230

 

WSC-7345:  William 1st “The Lion” Scottish Hammered Silver Penny.  Short Cross & Stars, Phase B coinage of 1205-1230.  Spink 5029.  +hVE WALTER – joint Edinburgh & Perth mints.  An excellent portrait piece, being just as good as the Spink plate coin.  £425

 

 

 

Alexander II

 

WSC-7650:  Alexander II (2nd) Medieval Scottish Hammered Silver Penny.  Phase C, circa 1230-34: coinage in the name of Alexander’s father, William the Lion: +: WILELMVS REX although this is the rare variety where the obverse legend is retrograde.  For some reason, possibly because Alexander II was very busy with insurrections, invasions and intrigue throughout his reign, coinage retained William’s name for some twenty years, although the portraits were Alexander II.  Joint moneyers working out of Roxburgh: PERIS ADAM DE ROCI. 1.16g, 3h.  Ashmolean 82, Burns 66c, Spink 5034.  Near VF for this particular issue.  Rare coin.  £745

 

WSC-7759:  Alexander II (2nd) Scottish Hammered Silver Voided Short Cross Penny.  The first issue, Phase C, circa 1230-34: coinage in the name of Alexander’s father, William the Lion: +: WILELMVS REX.  For some reason, possibly because Alexander II was very busy with insurrections, invasions and intrigue throughout his reign, coinage retained William’s name for some twenty years, although the portraits were Alexander II.  Joint moneyers working out of Roxburgh: PERIS ADAM ON RO. 1.32g, 6h.  SCBI 35, Burns 67a, Spink 5034.  Near VF for this particular issue.  Rare coin and a rarer still Burns’ variety.  £845

 

WSC-7966:  Rare Alexander II (2nd) in Alexander's name Scottish Hammered Silver Penny.  Short cross & stars, Phase D, circa 1235.  Roxburgh mint, left facing bust with sceptre, Spink 5036.  Obverse: [A]LEXANDER RE[X]; reverse: PIER[ES] ON ROE.  The impressive EMC / SCBI database has no examples.  The Glasgow Hunterian Museum has no examples.  The Oxford Ashmolean Museum has two examples, neither of which are as good as this coin.  The National Museum of Edinburgh has two examples, only one of which is illustrated (presumed the better of the two - the non illustrated coin being retrograde on the obv), which is not as good as this coin.  An early 2024 DNW auction witnessed an Alexander II Phase C penny in William's name go through at just under £1,300 after commissions.  Alexander II Phase D, in Alexander's own name, is a much, much rarer coin.  Ex Alaister McCay (2015), ex Tomlinson collection, ex Silbury Coins (old tickets in chronological order here).  An exceptionally rare coin and one in better grade than any of the major collection examples that I have managed to locate.  £2,450

 

 

 

Alexander III

 

1st Issue Pennies

 

WSC-6793:  Alexander III Rarer 1st Issue STIRLING Mint Penny.  Long cross & stars, 1250-80.  hO(N) RI. ON^S TR – Henri of Stirling.  Type III, SCBI 35, 137/A, Spink 5043.  Old collection piece.  A rare Scottish mint.  £395

 

 

 

2nd Coinage Pennies

 

WSC-6856:  Alexander III Scottish Hammered Silver Penny.  Second coinage, 1280-86.  Edinburgh mint town.  Class E, Spink 5056.  Not a great eye appeal coin (worn and centrally pierced) but a rare 20 point reverse.  £55

 

WSC-6769:  Alexander III Scottish Hammered Silver Penny.  Second coinage, 1280-86.  Perth mint town.  Class E, Spink 5056.  £145

 

WSC-6881:  Alexander III Scottish Hammered Silver Penny.  Second coinage, 1280-86.  Perth mint town.  Rarer class D,   Spink 5057.  From an old collection – see original ticket here.  £135

 

WSC-7275:  Alexander III Scottish Medieval Hammered Silver Penny.  Sterling class E with x20 points making this Edinburgh mint.  Spink 5056.  Actually quite a rare little coin as there are extra pellets: one pellet in the second and two in the fourth reverse quarters together with a pellet separating ALEXAND with ER on the obverse.  The National Museum of Scotland  in Edinburgh has a single example in their collection.  If you’re looking for interesting varieties, look no further!  £95

 

 

 

2nd Coinage Half Pennies

 

WSC-7651:  Alexander III Medieval Scottish Hammered Silver Round Halfpenny.  Second coinage, 1280-86, Spink 5061, SCBI 35, 287; B3.  Initial mark Cross Pattee, 0.60 grams, 6h.  You’ll likely see one of these for every one hundred second coinage pennies, and that’s probably conservative.  £225

 

 

 

John Baliol

 

 

 

Robert “The Bruce” 1st

 

Pennies

 

WSC-7619:  Robert The Bruce Hammered Silver Medieval Penny.  Robert 1st, 1306-29.  Crowned head left, sceptre before, beaded circles and legend surrounding, +:ROBERTVS: DEI: GRA:, rev. long cross pattee, pierced mullet of five points in each quarter, beaded circles +SCO TOR Vm R EX, weight 1.35g (Burns 1, figure 225; Spink 5076).  One of two star coins in the 2009 Drayton Hoard (the other was also a Robert Bruce that was sold through HistoryInCoins 9-6-22 for £2,200) – over a kilo of predominantly English medieval pennies.  The hoard was likely deposited in 1353; the last issue to be found in the hoard was an Edward III pre treaty York penny.  Only 34 coins out of the many thousands were Scottish.  The British Museum undertook a cursory examination and cleanup of the hoard but were unable to devote the necessary resources and time for a full study.  The coins were thereby returned to the finder under the Treasure Act where they were later sold.  A direct descendant of David 1st, Robert Bruce was crowned in 1306, on the back of ten turbulent years with various armies moving backwards and forwards over Scotland.  In 1318, Bruce’s reign saw the gradual repossession of the kingdom, partly from the English and partly from Scottish rivals.  It is likely that no coinage was struck for Robert Bruce until 1320.  Only three recorded dies, this one being Burns 1.   All Robert Bruce coinage is very rare but interestingly, although his coinage basically copied that of Alexander III, whereas Alexander’s coinage is often found VF or better, Robert Bruce’s coinage (on the rare occasions you do actually see an example) invariably turns up worn or damaged / pierced.  There have actually been a couple of Bruce pennies go through auction early 2024, both of which have achieved eye-watering prices at auction.  Look them up to see - I seem to recall one at over £4,000 hammer?  The all important provenance makes this coin extremely significant and desirable.  £2,650

 

David II

 

Groats

 

WSC-6773:  David II Medieval Scottish Hammered Silver Groat.  Third (Light) coinage, 1367-71  VILLA EDINBVRGH – Edinburgh mint.  Spink 5125 – star on the base of the sceptre coupled with trefoils within the tressure.  £275

 

 

Pennies

 

WSC-7490:  David II Medieval Scottish Hammered Silver Penny.  Second coinage, 1351-7, Edinburgh mint.  Spink 5088.  Nice grade coin.  £275

 

 

 

Robert II

 

Pennies

 

WSC-6093:  Robert II Scottish Hammered Silver Penny.  1371-90, Perth mint.  Interesting fact: Robert II’s grandfather was Robert the Bruce.  Spink 5146 – rarer variety.  £159

 

WSC-7935:  Robert II Scottish Medieval Hammered Silver Penny.  The first Scottish king of the Stewart line.  Edinburgh mint.  Crowned bust left, star on sceptre handle.  Spink 5145.  Robert II’s grandfather was Robert the Bruce; his mother, Marjorie Bruce, being Robert Bruce's daughter.  Robert was Regent under the imprisoned David II and was himself later imprisoned with his three sons in England when Edward III was recognised as successor to David II.  All Robert II coins are hard to source.  £395

 

WSC-7944:  Robert II Scottish Medieval Hammered Silver Penny.  The first Scottish king of the Stewart line.  Edinburgh mint.  Crowned bust left, rarer no star on sceptre handle.  Spink 5146.  Robert II’s grandfather was Robert the Bruce; his mother, Marjorie Bruce, being Robert Bruce's daughter.  Robert was Regent under the imprisoned David II and was himself later imprisoned with his three sons in England when Edward III was recognised as successor to David II.  All Robert II coins are hard to source.  £395

 

 

 

James II

 

WSC-7982:  James II Scottish Hammered Silver Penny.  First coinage, Billion silver issue (all James II pennies are from this issue), second issue, Edinburgh mint.  This is a rarer mule - a type Bi obverse with a clear initial mark Crown coupled with a type Biii reverse with saltires alongside the trefoil of pellets in the angles.  Spink 5251 / 5251B.  For clarification, the obverse to type Biii has initial mark Lis.  The old tickets don't reflect this muling of the dies because I assume the referencing system has only recently been updated.  The main image is appalling, even by my low standards, so here's one taken with a camera phone which clearly shows the obverse initial mark Crown - see here.  James II groats and halfgroats were designed to come into line with their English counterparts, at least that was the intention for the second coinage.  The Scottish did such a good job that the new groats did indeed look like English groats and were the same weight and had the same silver content as the English groats but unfortunately were valued at twelve pence in Scotland whereas the corresponding English groats were valued at four pence in England.  This produced serious consequences for the penny, especially as it was billion (and, in the spirit of not learning lessons, continued to be billon under James III), which ultimately had very little spending power, north or south of the border.  This is a very poor issue, as you'd expect with the billon nature of the silver content.  However, even though this is a rare denomination with very few extant examples, this coin is high grade for issue with all details / devices clear, as well as the bulk of the legends.  In a period where monarchs rarely ran the full course of their lives, James II met his maker in 1460 in one of the more unusual ways - during the siege of Roxburgh Castle, a canon next to the king accidentally blew up, terminating both cannon and king.  A very rare coin indeed with excellent provenance, the interesting muling and in high grade for issue.  £645

 

 

 

James III

 

WSC-7981:  James III Scottish Hammered Silver Groat.  Main issue, Gp.VI, circulating at 1s, 2d.  1484-88.  Bust half left with arched crown; long cross with crowns in x2 quarters.  Spink 5287.  These coins simply don’t turn up and when they do, they're found in fine grade at best, and usually grim, bordering on "dog-tag" grade.  The design of this issue was ground-breaking.  Previous to this issue silver coinage, or more specifically silver groats, were the ubiquitous front facing types as introduced under the English Edward 1st, although most commonly seen under Edward III onwards.  This was true for both England and Scotland.  There were temporary forays into side profile issues, eg David II and Robert II, but nothing like as ambitious as this James III half profile issue.  Incidentally, the English were still stuck on bog-standard front facing groats under Richard III at this point in time, highlighting how innovative the Scots were.  The problem with the bust half left coins was entirely down to the die sinkers.  Yes, the design was excellent but to cut a die to pull off an excellent coin, and to still have an excellent after several years of frenetic Scottish circulation (there was a distinct lack of coinage based on population numbers in Scotland), was a step too far.  There are parallels with the Commonwealth coinage - the 1649 designs, completely different from all that had gone before, just didn't work in practice on the end product; the coinage. By 1651 they were beginning to get there after subtly changing certain things.  The bust half left was just not cut with enough depth and differentiation.  We have single digit examples of good bust half left coins, undoubtedly initial or very early on strikes.  The dies didn't last resulting in circulation doing its worst.  This example is about VF on the reverse (easily VF for any number of Scottish issues), showing us that the combination of both circulation and die issues manifested itself remarkably quickly.  I have only had one other in better grade over many, many years.  Find a better example for sale today, or this year even!  A rare coin.  £1,875

 

WSC-7698:  Scottish James III Hammered Copper Three-Penny Penny.  Formally regarded as an Ecclesiastical “Crossraguel” issue of Bishop Kennedy.  Spink 5309.  If you’re interested, the Scottish had a penchant for naming coins from the actual coin legends (the Nonsunt under Mary springs to mind) and this is no exception.  James III was an interesting individual.  Crowned aged 9, the Scots lost Berwick to keep the peace with England but gained Orkney and the Shetland Isles as a part dowry (which makes you wonder what the other part of the dowry was!) when James married Margaret of Denmark (she was just 13).  James III was so unpopular due to his lifestyle and blind insistence upon a policy of pursuing an alliance with the Kingdom of England that he was, perhaps inevitably, murdered after his defeat at Sauchieburn.  Struck on a generous flan with a nice grade reverse.  £245

 

WSC-7551:  James III Hammered Silver Scottish Groat.  Type VI, main issue of 1484-88.  Edinburgh mint.  Spink 5288.  24mm, 3.83g.  Toned and with a stain on the reverse.  Sold with a detailed information slip.  Extremely good grade for issue.  £1,395

 

WSC-7722:  James III Scottish Hammered Billon Silver Penny.  Billon coinage, 1475-82, Edinburgh mint.  Facing bust with three fleurs to the crown – Spink 5302.  Although only Fine, this is probably one of the top grade extant examples.  The Spink example (similar for type) is outstanding but this is a rounder coin with more detail overall.  Sold with old tickets – ex Daniels (a remarkable ticket), purchased 1940’s? for 2 shillings, ex Spink, 2007, £325 + commissions, ex Phil Higginson collection.  A very rare coin in this grade.  £595

 

 

 

James IV

 

WSC-7699:  Scottish James IV Hammered Billon Silver Penny.  Type III with a larger bust, Spink 5361.  Edinburgh mint.  Ex Patrick Finn from the 1990’s (sold £150), ex Mark Rasmusson.  Excellent grade for issue.  £285

 

 

 

James V

 

WSC-6799:  James V Scottish Stuart Hammered Billon Silver Bawbee.  Third coinage, 1538-42.  Struck at 0.250 silver fineness (earlier silver issues under “normal” times were struck at 0.833 silver fineness) although looking at this coin, you’d perhaps question if it really is that low.  Annulet over obverse I so Spink 5384.  1.89 grams, 23mm.  Rarer monarch.  £235

 

 

 

Mary

 

WSC-7828:  Mary Queen of Scots Hammered Billon Silver Bawbee.  Struck in the first period of Mary’s reign, 1542-58, Edinburgh mint.  Spink 5432.  Interestingly, not only was that period before her marriage, it was actually during the Regency period where the Earl of Aran was Regent while Mary was still under age – the reverse cinquefoils apparently acknowledge this.  Evenly toned, VF and about as struck.  A superb example from this iconic Scottish monarch.  £385

 

WSC-7692:  Mary Scottish Stuart Hammered Billon Silver Bawbee.  First period, 1542-58, before her marriage - remember, Mary was born December 1542.  Issue of ¾ alloy although looking much higher in the hand.  Edinburgh mint, plain saltire cross, Spink 5432.  Sold with a couple of old tickets (the most recent giving an incorrect Spink number) – see here.  One of the nicest examples of this issue that you’re ever likely to find for sale.  £425

 

WSC-7104:  Mary Queen of Scots Hammered Billon Silver Bawbee.  Struck in the first period of Mary’s reign, 1542-58, Edinburgh mint.  Interestingly, not only was that period before her marriage, it was actually during the Regency period where the Earl of Aran was Regent while Mary was still under age – the reverse cinquefoils apparently acknowledge this.  Evenly toned and VF with the usual flat areas.  Spink 5432.  Sold with a very detailed information slip.  £335

 

WSC-7209:  Mary, Queen of Scots, Hammered Silver Bawbee or Sixpence.  Struck in the first period of Mary’s reign, 1542-58, Edinburgh mint.  Interestingly, not only was that period before her marriage, it was actually during the Regency period where the Earl of Aran was Regent while Mary was still under age – the reverse cinquefoils apparently acknowledge this.  Spink 5432 - solid saltire cross.  £255

 

WSC-7953:  Mary Queen of Scots CHOICE Grade Hammered Billon Silver Bawbee.  First period sixpence, before marriage, 1542-58.  Edinburgh mint.  Solid saltire cross through the crown, Spink 5432.  This was issued at 3/4 alloy, which accounts for the grim and / or problematic nature of most examples that turn up.  This is an exceptionally nice example being choice for issue.  £475 RESERVED (E.M.11-1-24 posted on approval)

 

WSC-7587:  1557 Mary Queen of Scots Hammered Billon Siler Plack.  First period before Mary’s marriage, 1542-58.  Issue of ¾ (.750) alloy.  Spink 5437.  Circulated as a fourpenny piece.  £245

 

WSC-7822:  1559 Scottish Mary Queen of Scots Hammered Billon Silver Nonsunt.  A twelve penny groat struck in the second period, 1558-60, under both Mary and her husband, Francis.  It was an issue of half alloy (.5 fine) which was actually quite high considering the Lions of the same date which were 23/24 alloy - basically base metal.  The obverse crowned heraldic dolphin is facing left (it's my belief that left facing is the rarer of the two) so this is Spink 5448.  If you're scratching your head over the derivation of the term "nonsunt", look no further than the reverse legend.  A small hole at 12 o'clock.  As the ticket states, rarely seen these days.  £285

 

 

 

James VI

 

WSC-7701:  1575 Scottish James VI Hammered Silver Half Merk or Noble.  Second coinage, 6s 8d, Spink 5478.  A better date.  Ex Mark Rasmusson.  Very nice grade.  £395

 

WJC-7790:  1582 James VI Hammered Silver Ten Shillings.  Fourth coinage, Spink 5490, Edinburgh mint, although there is a 1585 extant document referring to “pestilence at the Edinburgh mint” and thus the need to strike coinage at Dundee and Perth.  This series (40s, 30s, 20s and this 10s) is considered to be one of the finest examples of monarchical depiction and it is certainly a dramatic departure from the norm in terms of what went before.  The trouble was, this was all new to the die sinkers of the day and so whilst the end product at the mint was of adequate quality, after an extremely short period in circulation (and remember, Scottish circulation was much more intense than south of the border due to lack of sufficient coinage physically in circulation), the inadequate, shallow dies quickly became apparent through the quality of the coinage.  Lessons were seemingly learnt as the seventh coinage adopted a toned-down, more traditional depiction of the king.  £465

 

WSC-7413:  James VI Scottish Hammered Silver Eightpenny Groat.  Coinage of 1583-90, being before James VI took on the English throne after the death of Elizabeth 1st in 1604.  Edinburgh mint.  An issue of 0.25 fineness.  Not quite as good as the better example I have listed but certainly getting there.  £185

 

WSC-7656:  1602 James VI Scottish Stuart Hammered Silver Full Merk.  Eighth coinage, Spink 5497.  Rarer 13 shilling, 4 pence denomination with a very clear date.  £265

 

 

 

Charles 1st

 

Silver

 

WSC-7871:  Charles 1st Scottish 30 Shillings.  Third coinage, intermediate issue, 1637-42.  14.76g, 6h.  SCBI 35, 1457 (same dies), Spink 5554, Bull 7 (this coin illustrated).  Initial mark Thistle both sides.  An intermediate issue falling between Briot and Falconer although the horse is a Briot style horse.  Ex Colonel Morrieson (1987 - acquired from a Spink sale of that same year), ex Maurice Bull.  Old tickets here and here.  An interesting contemporary political defacement in the form of a scrape on the king on this otherwise Good VF grade coin.  £1,795

 

WSC-7744:  1625 Charles 1st Scottish Hammered Silver Six Shillings.  First coinage, first date in series, Spink 5543.  This is an excessively rare issue – Charles’ Scottish coronation didn’t happen until 1633 and no new dies were produced until then.  Dies of James VI were altered, under an official directive, and coinage was issued as Charles 1st using the old, modified dies  This resulted in the Twelve Shilling and Six Shilling coins literally having a bust of James VI on the front with just a quick name change to the legend and a tweak or two to the beard.  This Charles 1st Six Shilling issue, along with the James VI Six Shilling issue, often goes well under the radar with many people think these coins are simply English dated sixpences.  I refer the reader to the Scottish James VI section of this website for extra information.  You might be thinking that this isn’t much of a coin to look at and just looking at it, you’d be correct.  However, nice grade examples do not turn up simply because this issue was generally poorly struck using modified, often worn-out dies.  The Spink plate coin is a £5,000+ coin.  This is one of the rarest Charles 1st Scottish silver coin issues, if not the rarest.  I’d be surprised if this coin didn’t attract a buyer very quickly.  £1,245 RESERVED (M.He.9-5-22 Lay-Away)

 

WSC-6015:  Scottish Charles 1st Hammered Silver Twelve Shillings.  Third coinage, 1637 – 1642.  Falconer’s second issue, type IV.  Spink 5563.  The coin is sold with a very old ticket, possibly WW2 period, stating that this coin was purchased for twenty five shillings.  £325

 

WSC-7910:  1637-42 Charles 1st Scottish 40 Pence.  Third coinage, Falconer issue.  Spink 5579.  The 40 pence is much harder to find than the 20 pence but more than that, the grade is excellent for issue - collectors will be aware how badly this denomination fared during the last 370 years.  This is one of the best examples I've ever had.  Provenance going right back to July 1951.  Rare thus.  £325

 

WSC-6946:  Scottish Charles 1st UNRECORDED Hammered Silver Forty Pence.  Third coinage, Briot-Falconer transitional issue of 1637-42 with an F (for Falconer) modified from a B (for Briot) below the reverse thistle.  At first glance this appears to be a standard B below the reverse thistle, so Spink 5576.  However, it’s clearly an F, modified from the earlier B – note the slightly bulbous top vertical and the very start of the bottom bulbous part of the B protruding slightly from the centre, these being the only aspects of the underlying B.  Everything else about this letter is an F.  See the following image, although please note that all letters have been rotated to the upright for ease of use.  There actually is no Falconer 40 pence recorded with an F below, only the B below.  However, Briot’s Spink 5576 with a B below is a B lying on its back, facing upwards, whilst this letter is 180 degrees rotated and facing downwards.  It’s an F for Falconer and as such, unrecorded.  Falconer naturally followed on from Briot during the Third Coinage of Charles 1st Scottish coins so this coin would appear to be a very rare transition from Briot to Falconer.  You’d think that one engraver would be highly unlikely to basically take his predecessor’s dies, churn out coinage and then call them his own by way of putting his mark on them and doing nothing else.  However, Nicholas Briot was appointed master of the Scottish mint in 1634 and later joined by his son-in-law, John Falconer, who eventually succeeded him in 1646.  By keeping things in the family and having an organic “passing on of the baton”, it becomes much more plausible that Falconer did the above.  An interesting coin; potentially the “missing link” between Briot and Falconer.  Perhaps it will be termed Third Coinage, type IIA as it certainly comes before Falconer’s first recorded type III.  £395

 

WSC-7880:  Charles 1st Scottish Hammered Silver 40 Pence with Excellent Provenance.  Third coinage, type 1 Briot issue, Spink 5579.  See old tickets here: Burns p.462/14 but different dies, Murray O6/Rf.  Ex Cochran-Patrick (his old ticket), sold to Seaby 1950.  An uncommon denomination, seeming getting rarer by the day, but more importantly, bearing in mind the usual poor, damaged state these 40d coins usually turn up in, a very good grade example - given as VF by old tickets.  A rare opportunity to acquire not only a good grade Scottish Stuart coin, but one with long provenance.  £345

 

WSC-7674:  Stuart Charles 1st Scottish Hammered Silver Forty Pence.  Third coinage, 1637-42, type 1 using Briot dies.  Spink 5577.  There were five types in the third coinage – three for Falconer, one intermediate but only one for Briot.  A much rarer denomination compared to the twenty pence.  Generally a poor issue, this being one of the best grade examples I’ve had.  £255

 

WSC-6989:  Charles 1st Hammered Silver Scottish Twenty Pence.  The rarer second coinage (Briot’s hammered issue) of 1636 only, not to be confused with the later third coinage.  Spink 5550.  Sold with an old dealer’s ticket together with an information slip and an annotated coin envelope.  £145

 

WSC-5367:  Scotland Charles 1st Hammered Silver Twenty Pence.  Third coinage, 1637 – 42.  Briot’s machine made issue.  £95

 

WSC-7911:  1637-42 Charles 1st Scottish 20 Pence.  Third coinage, Falconer issue.  Spink 5591.  Provenance going right back to July 1955.  Good grade for issue.  £195

 

 

 

Copper

 

WSC-6874:  Scottish Charles 1st Copper Turner.  Earl of Stirling coinage, 1632-39.  Spink 5598.  Part of a single deceased collection put together from the 1960's onwards with this ticket looking to be dated 1989.  Type 1c with im flower over lozenge.  £48

 

 

 

Milled Coinage

 

Charles II

 

Silver

 

WJC-7046:  1669 Charles II Scottish Silver Half Merk.  6s, 8d, struck under the first coinage.  Spink 5614.  Rarer en medaille die axis.  £165

 

WSC-6688:  1670 Charles II Scottish Silver Merk.  First coinage.  Interesting for two reasons: 1. There is a colon after the date and 2. The die axis is 85 degrees which is noted in Spink (p96) as considerably rarer than the standard 180 or en medaille die axis types.  £185

 

WSC-7096:  Charles II 1670 Scottish Milled Half Merk or 6s, 8d.  First coinage, Spink 5614.  Three factors elevate this coin above most others: a) High grade for issue, b) The die axis is a rare and bazaar 90 degrees and c) There are no obverse stops (a rare variety recorded by Spink).  Both an interesting and rare offering.  £435

 

WSC-6455:  1671 Charles II Scottish Silver Merk.  First coinage.  Interesting for two reasons: 1. The grade is much better than usually seen and 2. The die axis is 85 degrees which is noted in Spink (p96) as considerably rarer than the standard 180 or en medaille die axis types.  £225

 

WSC-6697:  1672 Charles II Scottish Silver HALF Merk.  First coinage.  Spink 5614.  Above average for issue.  £125

 

WSC-7284:  1677/6 Scottish Charles II Milled Silver Quarter Dollar.  Second coinage, Sir John Falconer, Master of the Mint issue.  A machine-made issue with the machinery to facilitate this obtained from London in 1675.  Spink 5620.  Rarely found in better grade than this and often (usually) found in worse grade.  Scottish coinage of this period was in short supply and thus usage was high.  £295

 

WSC-6096:  1677 Charles II Scottish Silver 1/16th Dollar.  Second coinage, Sir John Falconer, Master of the Mint issue.  A machine-made issue with the machinery to facilitate this obtained from London in 1675. Interestingly, the only denomination in the series to have a reverse Saltire Cross.  High grade for issue.  Spink 5624.  £325

 

WSC-7105:  1680 Charles II Scottish Silver Eighth Dollar.  Second coinage, Sir John Falconer, Master of the Mint issue.  A machine-made issue with the machinery to facilitate this obtained from London in 1675.  Spink 5622.  180 degree die axis.  £110

 

WSC-5838:  1682 over 1680 Scottish Charles II Silver ¼ Dollar.  Second coinage, Sir John Falconer, Master of the Mint issue.  A machine-made issue with the machinery to facilitate this obtained from London in 1675.  Good grade for issue.  £235

 

 

Copper

 

WSC-6657:  1677 Scottish Charles II Turner / Bodle.  The first date in only a three year issue.  Better grade for issue, being actually better than the Spink plate coin, and benefiting from being the rarer LAESSET error issue.  Spink 5632 (£200 in the 2015 guide).  A desirable coin.  £125

 

WSC-6666:  1677 Scottish Charles II Turner / Bodle.  The first date in only a three year issue.  Better grade for issue, being actually better than the Spink plate coin.  Spink 5630 (£135 in the 2015 guide).  £55

 

WSC-6650:  1677 Scottish Charles II Copper Bawbee or Sixpence.  First date in only a three year issue.  Spink 5628.  Better grade for issue, being about as good as the Spink plate coin.  £75

 

WSC-6651:  1678 Scottish Charles II Copper Bawbee or Sixpence.  Second date in only a three year issue.  Spink 5628.  Better grade for issue, being nearly as good as the Spink plate coin.  £65

 

WSC-6652:  1679 Scottish Charles II Copper Bawbee or Sixpence.  Third and rarest date in only a three year issue.  Spink 5628.  Better grade for issue, being nearly as good as the Spink plate coin.  £65

 

 

 

James VII

 

WSC-7983:  1687 James VII Scottish Silver Ten Shillings.  Single pellet either side of the date and either side of the 10 below bust.  The reverse depicting St Andrew's cross with national emblems.  Spink 5641.  A very short issue - just three years - due to James being trounced by William of Orange at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690.  He lived out the rest of his days in exile in France, dying in 1701.  Graded XF40 (extremely fine 40) which in reality is actually a straight VF obverse, GVF reverse.  Incidentally, this coin is the third highest graded example of this date recorded on the NGC database.  Should collectors wish to disassociate coin from slab, I'm told it is a very quick, easy and most gratifying process.  £995

 

 

 

William & Mary

 

WJC-7475:  HIGH GRADE and CHOICE 1691 William & Mary Scottish Copper Bawbee.  Circulated at a sixpence.  En medaille die rotation.  Dublin.  An act of Privy Council in August 1691 authorised a small issue of copper coins (Bawbees and Bodles combined), being up to 500 stones in weight or less per year, but never to be exceeded.  This act carried on when Mary died into the reign of William II, but effectively, these were the last Scottish copper coins to date. Initial mark Cross of Five Pellets (many people don’t even realise these things have initial marks as the grade seen dictates there is usually nothing to be seen!), Spink 5666.  Collectors will be aware that you hardly ever come across Bawbees (of any reign) in VF – they were from soft metal and simply did not survive the rigours of circulation.  Further, the obverse dies of William & Mary bawbees specifically were simply not up to the job as there was too much design to engrave with the conjoined busts to give a good result.  The trick with these things is to look at the reverse of any coins in order to gauge the grade as often, as in this case, the obverse side would have left the mint fairly close to how it looks in this coin, ie not a patch on the reverse.  This coin is approaching EF for issue.  One or two bawbees of this grade recently came up in Heritage Auctions where they all achieved four figure prices.  I don’t expect to ever have Bawbees of this quality ever again – they are that rare.  £695

 

WJC-7476:  HIGH GRADE and CHOICE 1692 William & Mary Scottish Copper Bawbee.  Circulated at a sixpence.  180 degree die rotation.  Dublin.  An act of Privy Council in August 1691 authorised a small issue of copper coins (Bawbees and Bodles combined), being up to 500 stones in weight or less per year, but never to be exceeded.  This act carried on when Mary died into the reign of William II, but effectively, these were the last Scottish copper coins to date. Initial mark Two Small Trefoils, (many people don’t even realise these things have initial marks as the grade seen dictates there is usually nothing to be seen!), Spink 5668.  Collectors will be aware that you hardly ever come across Bawbees (of any reign) in VF – they were from soft metal and simply did not survive the rigours of circulation.  Further, the obverse dies of William & Mary bawbees specifically were simply not up to the job as there was too much design to engrave with the conjoined busts to give a good result.  The trick with these things is to look at the reverse of any coins in order to gauge the grade as often, as in this case, the obverse side would have left the mint fairly close to how it looks in this coin, ie not a patch on the reverse.  This coin is EF for issue – Spink don’t think any coins in this grade exist for this year, as evidenced in Spink 2020.    One or two bawbees of this grade, possibly not quite as good as this one in particular, recently came up in Heritage Auctions where they all achieved four figure prices.  I don’t expect to ever have Bawbees of this quality ever again – they are that rare.  £895

 

WJC-7477:  HIGH GRADE and CHOICE 1692 William & Mary Scottish Copper Bawbee.  Circulated at a sixpence.  En medaille die rotation.  Dublin.  An act of Privy Council in August 1691 authorised a small issue of copper coins (Bawbees and Bodles combined), being up to 500 stones in weight or less per year, but never to be exceeded.  This act carried on when Mary died into the reign of William II, but effectively, these were the last Scottish copper coins to date. Initial mark Cross of Five Pellets, or Rosette, (many people don’t even realise these things have initial marks as the grade seen dictates there is usually nothing to be seen!), Spink 5667.  Collectors will be aware that you hardly ever come across Bawbees (of any reign) in VF – they were from soft metal and simply did not survive the rigours of circulation.  Further, the obverse dies of William & Mary bawbees specifically were simply not up to the job as there was too much design to engrave with the conjoined busts to give a good result.  The trick with these things is to look at the reverse of any coins in order to gauge the grade as often, as in this case, the obverse side would have left the mint fairly close to how it looks in this coin, ie not a patch on the reverse.  This coin is EF for issue – Spink don’t think any coins in this grade exist for this year, as evidenced in Spink 2020.  One or two bawbees of this grade, possibly not quite as good as this one in particular, recently came up in Heritage Auctions where they all achieved four figure prices.  I don’t expect to ever have Bawbees of this quality ever again – they are that rare.  £795

 

WJC-7478:  HIGH GRADE, CHOICE & VERY, VERY RARE 1692 DOUBLE DATED William & Mary Scottish Copper Bawbee.  Circulated at a sixpence.  En medaille die rotation.  Dublin.  This is the extremely rare 1692 error which left the mint with the date on BOTH SIDES.  It is the ‘…ET 1692 REGINA’ error under Spink 5666.  An act of Privy Council in August 1691 authorised a small issue of copper coins (Bawbees and Bodles combined), being up to 500 stones in weight or less per year, but never to be exceeded.  This act carried on when Mary died into the reign of William II, but effectively, these were the last Scottish copper coins to date. Initial mark Vertical Line of Three Pellets – unrecorded in Spink – (many people don’t even realise these things have initial marks as the grade seen dictates there is usually nothing to be seen!).  Collectors will be aware that you hardly ever come across Bawbees (of any reign) in VF – they were from soft metal and simply did not survive the rigours of circulation.  Further, the obverse dies of William & Mary bawbees specifically were simply not up to the job as there was too much design to engrave with the conjoined busts to give a good result.  The trick with these things is to look at the reverse of any coins in order to gauge the grade as often, as in this case, the obverse side would have left the mint fairly close to how it looks in this coin, ie not a patch on the reverse.  This coin is nearly EF for issue but there are no better grade examples known for this rare double date error.  One or two bawbees of this grade, possibly not quite as good as this one in particular, and certainly not as rare as this variety, recently came up in Heritage Auctions where they all achieved four figure prices.  I don’t expect to ever have Bawbees of this quality & rarity ever again – they are that rare.  £995

 

WSC-7908:  1692 William & Mary Scottish Silver 10 Shillings.  Conjoined busts, GRATIA legend, small 10 under the busts - Spink 5661.  If you’re wondering why it is that Scottish coinage always seems to be worn to within an inch of its life, it’s because even though Scotland’s population was thin on the ground compared to England’s, the coinage minted wasn’t nearly enough to go around.  Also, the Scottish economy was such that coinage wasn’t secreted away for a rainy day – it was used repeatedly simply to survive.  This is a very nice coin indeed for issue, being fairly comparable with the Spink plate coin for 5660, which was the very best they could find from their not-so-little black book of contacts.  £445

 

 

 

William II

 

WSC-6921:  1697 William II of Scotland Silver Five Shillings.  A rare example of a Scottish five shillings – the vast majority of the few you see will invariably be Queen Anne.  A high grade example, being the best I've ever seen and by some margin.  Spink 5688.  You are not seeing much wear on this coin, rather poor dies / inadequate pressure at the minting stage on the large definition areas, ie the king's bust.  Please ignore the aberration of a main image in terms of colouring (I may well need a new camera soon!) and use this image to see the even colouring throughout.  £650 in EF in the Spink 2020 price guide (already quite out of date).  There are certainly EF areas to this coin.  The English (ie Norman) William I and William II were not the same person as the Scottish William I, but Scottish William II and English William III were indeed the same person!!  A very rare coin in this grade.  £395

 

 

 

1700’s Church “Communion Tokens” (20% max off all marked prices when you buy 2 or more Communion Tokens!!)

 

WSC-5472:  1748 Scottish Communion Church Token.  A very early date indeed.  Dull, Perthshire.  Burzinski 3585 (image annotation for B number is incorrect).  Rare.  £25

 

WSC-4728:  1755 Scottish Communion Church Token.  A very early date indeed.  Cadder, Lanarkshire.  Minister Alexander Dun.  Burzinski 1190.  Rare.  £25

 

WSC-5473:  1793 Scottish Communion Church Token.  An early date.  Dull, Perthshire.  Burzinski 5029 (image annotation for B number is incorrect).  £25

 

WSC-4730:  1796 Scottish Communion Church token.  An early date.  Rare.  £25

 

WSC-5700:  1700’s Scottish Communion Church Token.  Mortlack, Banffshire.  Burzinski 4515.  £25

 

WSC-5701:  1700’s Scottish Communion Church Token.  Millbrex, Aberdeenshire.  Burzinski 4512.  £25

 

WSC-5702:  1790 Scottish Communion Church Token.  Craigend, Perthshire.  Minister Robert Forsyth.  Burzinski 1262.  £25

 

H174: 1700's Scottish Communion Token "LK" - Apparently Unrecorded in Burzinski.  See image for details.  Old collection piece.  £25

 

H173: 1700's Scottish Communion Token - Berwickshire - Burzinski 6841.  See image for details.  Old collection piece.  £25

 

H108: 1772 Scottish Communion Token - Larbert, Stirlingshire - Burzinski 2021.  See image for details.  Old collection piece.  £25

 

H031: 1791 Scottish Communion Token - Leith, Lothians, Burzinski 4197.  See image for details.  Old collection piece.  £25

 

H007: 1775 Scottish Communion Token - Lochgoilphead, Argyll, Burzinski 4167.  See image for details.  Old collection piece.  £25

 

WSC-5943:  1700’s Scottish Communion Church Token.  Lairg, Sutherland.  Burzinski 4067.  £25

 

WSC-5944:  1799 Scottish Communion Church Token.  Liff & Benvie, Angus.  Burzinski 4269.  £25 RESERVED (P.D.10/8/21)

 

 

1800’s Church “Communion Tokens” (20% max off all marked prices when you buy 2 or more Communion Tokens!!)

 

WSC-5698:  1871 Scottish Communion Church Token.  Leven, Fife.  Minister John S. Hyslop.  Burzinski 4248.  £25

 

H180: 1800's Scottish Communion Token - St Ninians, North Leith, Burzinski 5280.  See image for details.  Old collection piece.  £25

 

H169: 1840 Scottish Communion Token - Glasgow, Lanarkshire - Burzinski 4818 VAR.  See image for details.  Old collection piece.  £25

 

H168: 1843 Scottish Communion Token - Monzie, Perthshire - Burzinski 4974.  See image for details.  Old collection piece.  £25

 

H167: 1835 Scottish Communion Token - Leitholm, Berwickshire - Burzinski 4206.  See image for details.  Old collection piece.  £25

 

H112: 1850 Scottish Communion Token - Musselburgh, Lothians - Burzinski 5108.  See image for details.  Old collection piece.  £25

 

H111: 1838 Scottish Communion Token - Dalkeith, Lothians - Burzinski 1858.  See image for details.  Old collection piece.  £25

 

H078: 1801 Scottish Communion Token - Mains & Strathmartine - Burzinski 4594.  See image for details.  Old collection piece.  £25

 

H073: 1802 Scottish Communion Token - Madderty, Perthshire - Burzinski 4581.  See image for details.  Old collection piece.  £25

 

H034: 1827 Scottish Communion Token - Kinnell, Angus, Burzinski 3832.  See image for details.  Old collection piece.  £25