Ancient Gold Coins

-------->Remember, postage is included<--------

 

 

 

Scottish & English Hammered and Milled Gold Coins:

 

 

Please note that Lay-Away is no longer available on any gold coinage unless by prior arrangement. 

 

 

WAu-7993:  Extremely Rare Celtic Gold Full Stater.  Gallic War issue  - Ambiani - imported from Gaul or specifically, the modern day Rouen area of France, circa 60-50 BC.  A seemingly common enough Ambiani stater from the Gallic War period with the disjoined or sinuous horse, right, and a blank obverse.  However, the double "S" below the horse and either side of the pellet render this coin excessively rare.  Ancient British Coins (ABC) by Chris Rudd, the go-to reference for Celtic coins since 2010, taking over from Van Arsdell, has no recorded examples.  Ambiani is ABC 16, with nothing either side of the pellet.  He lists an Atrebates stater (ABC 19) as having a single S below the horse but the coin for sale here is NOT Atrebates (the Atrebates were separated from the Ambiani by the Canche river) as they have a letter A on the obverse.  Spink lump the Gallic War issues together and put forward Spink 13 - a stater with a single S on the reverse, but this turns out to be Atrebates and references back to ABC 19 - but again, even if this was the correct attribution, and it isn't, it's just a single S whereas this coin has a double reversed S.  Interestingly, the double reverse "SS" symbols appear on slightly later staters and quarter staters from the North Thames region, ABC 2237 and 2243-49 (these are the only marks on an otherwise plain reverse, unlike the symbols on this coin) and are thought to represent lightning flashes rather than letters.  So, a very common tribe (although interestingly, Ambiani staters now seem to be more expensive than Coritani staters, which certainly wasn't the case a decade ago) but an excessively rare variant that is to my knowledge unrecorded and / or unpublished.  Quite a find!  5.85g (see image here).  From an old Northern collection - the collector does not want to be named on the internet but is willing for me to disclose his name and town to the buyer for provenance.  £1,895

 

WAu-7994:  Celtic Gold Spiral Type Full Stater.  Trinovantes & Catuvellauni - Addedomaros, circa 50 BC to 1 AD.  Originally located north of the Thames area, central to the east coast.  A spiral wreath of x6 arms extending outwards from three back-to-back crescents at the centre.  The reverse horse is facing right with a ring pellet either side and a cornucopia below.  Spink 210, ABC 2517 - Ancient British Coins by Chris Rudd, the go-to reference for Celtic coins since 2010, taking over from Van Arsdell.  Not a rare coin but rare in this grade - it's generally not a well defined issue but this coin is a strong example with little wear.  Toned and lustrous.  Excellent provenance.  £975 RESERVED J.K.

Found Wing, Buckinghamshire

Ex T. Matthews (1999)

Ex Haddenham collection

Ex Spink

 

WAu-7995:  Celtic Gold Full Stater.  Gallic War issue  - Ambiani - imported from Gaul or specifically, the modern day Rouen area of France, circa 60-50 BC.  A common enough Ambiani stater from the Gallic War period with the disjoined or sinuous horse, right, and a blank obverse.  Ambiani staters were very common a decade or so ago on the back of a couple of large hoards that came up.  However, all those coins are now dispersed into institutions or collections and the price has risen rather impressively, to the point where they are now more expensive than Coritani staters.  Spink 11, ABC 16 - Ancient British Coins (ABC) by Chris Rudd, the go-to reference for Celtic coins since 2010, taking over from Van Arsdell.  From an old collection - the collector does not want to be named on the internet but is willing for me to disclose his name and town to the buyer for provenance.  See here for old tickets etc.  £770

Found Herts, 1990's

Ex Chris Rudd (sold for £550 back in the day)

Ex Northern collection

 

WAu-7996:  Rare Celtic Gold Broad Flan Type Quarter Stater.  Ambiani tribe - imported from Gaul or specifically, the modern day Rouen area of France, circa 3rd century BC to the mid 1st century AD.  These were the first coins to be used in Britain.  Gallo-Belgic "Broad Flan" type with a rather impressive flamboyantly wreathed head facing right on the obverse and a somewhat stylised horse on the reverse, again facing right.  Spink 6, ABC 28 (listed "Rare") - Ancient British Coins (ABC) by Chris Rudd, the go-to reference for Celtic coins since 2010, taking over from Van Arsdell.  From an old collection - the collector does not want to be named on the internet but is willing for me to disclose his name and town to the buyer for provenance.  See here for old tickets etc.  £670

Ex J.Follws collection

Ex Chris Rudd (sold for £500 back in the day)

Ex Northern collection

 

WAu-7997:  Rare Celtic Tincomarus Spiral Type Quarter Stater.  Regini & Atrebates (south of the River Thames), Tincommius (now thought to be Tincomarus based on the 1996 Alton Hoard), circa 25 BC to AD 10.  Termed the Tincomarus Spiral, although it's actually a circular wreath giving the impression of a spiral.  Pellet at the centre.  The reverse depicts a horse galloping to the right with a "T" sloping to the left above the horse.  The apparent letter "C" below the horse is a rear horses leg in full gallop.  Spink 73, ABC 1094 (listed "Rare") - Ancient British Coins (ABC) by Chris Rudd, the go-to reference for Celtic coins since 2010, taking over from Van Arsdell.  From an old collection - the collector does not want to be named on the internet but is willing for me to disclose his name and town to the buyer for provenance.  See here for old tickets etc.  £680

Ex J.Follws collection

Ex Chris Rudd (sold for £550 back in the day)

Ex Northern collection

 

WAu-7999:  Extremely Rare Celtic Unrecorded Quarter Stater.  North Thames Region, Eastern.  The x33 uninscribed coins found predominantly in the Eastern part of the North Thames Region, especially Essex, can not be comfortably attributed to the Trinovantes nor the Catuvellauni.  They are all extremely rare (Van Arsdell only listed x7).  Current attribution has this coin in the "Cantian-inspired gold and silver types" category.  Obverse plain field apart from a single "S" shape in the centre (the main image did not really highlight the "S" so I've added another image here) - reverse "S" symbols are thought to represent lightning flashes rather than letters although this "S" is not inverted / the reverse depicts a tree-like trophy on a triad of ringed pellets with various motifs surrounding.  Spink not listed, ABC 2249 (listed "Extremely Rare") - Ancient British Coins (ABC) by Chris Rudd, the go-to reference for Celtic coins since 2010, taking over from Van Arsdell.  From an old collection - the collector does not want to be named on the internet but is willing for me to disclose his name and town to the buyer for provenance.  See here for old tickets etc.  £885

Ex Chris Rudd (sold for £650 back in the day)

Ex Northern collection

 

WAu-8056:  **Choice** Saxon Merovingian Gold Tremissis.   Wico in Pontio (Quentovic), c. 620-640. Tremissis (Gold, 13mm, 1.26g, 0h), Moneyer Dutta. +VVICCO FIT Laureate bust to right. Rev. DVTTA MONET, Cross on three steps. Belfort 4959. NM II p. 55, 14. Prou 1125.  Rare but rarer still being centrally struck and such good grade. Clear and well struck, good very fine or better.  The Merovingian Dynasty was based in ancient Gaul (which is now France) and dates from the middle of the 5th century AD.  The coins were very much trading pieces and many have been found in Britain as Saxon trade between the Continent and Britain was extremely robust.  Similar examples have been found as far west as Cornwall and as far north as Northumbria.  Ex Ian Millington (an expert on Anglo Saxon coinage), ex Silbury Coins (their ticket), ex DNW.  You will not find a better example of this early Saxon gold coin.  It really is a choice coin.  £3,250

 

WAu-7812:  Edward III Medieval Hammered Gold Full Noble.  Fourth coinage, post-treaty period of 1369-77, group III.  Spink 1521, North 1281, Schneider 115.  Calais mint.  The town of Calais in what is now Northern France was under English rule from 1347 until 7 January 1558, being a bit of a vanity statement for the English monarchs in their claim on the French crown. It cost almost 1/5th of all the revenue collected in England to maintain Calais as an English possession.  The mint was opened in 1363 as a direct result of the treaty between France and England and meant the mintage of coinage for England could be outsourced to Calais to aid in the newly formed cross-channel trading routes.  The relationship between the two countries has perhaps always been a tad strained - the mint closed in 1440 after really only producing limited coinage under Edward III, a tiny amount of gold under Richard II and Henry IV, a miniscule quantity of farthings under Henry V and some of the earlier coinage of Henry VI.  Rusty obverse dies – perhaps a result of French sea air?!  Ex Malthouse collection; also accompanied by a much earlier, unidentified ticket.  £5,450

 

WAu-7555:  Edward IV Hammered Medieval Gold Ryal or Rose Noble.  Light Coinage of 1464 – 1470 only, London mint, small fleurs in spandrels, initial mark Crown, Spink 1951.  This coin, issued in 1465, whilst unambiguously attractive in design, was a bit of a disaster.  It superseded the old Noble because this was now considered a clunky and old fashioned denomination at 6s. 8d.  The new Ryal or Rose Noble denomination was nice and user-friendly at 10 shillings.  However, it wasn’t.  The noble had been around for so long that 6s. 8d. had actually become the professionals’ standard fee.  Whilst these professionals wouldn’t have minded being the beneficiary of a not inconsequential pay rise virtually overnight, the people who employed these individuals were most certainly not up for that.  Thus the new 10 shilling Ryal or Rose Noble denomination was itself superseded just 5 years later by the gold Angel and everyone was happy because the Angel circulated at, wait for it, exactly the same as the old Noble - 6s. 8d, or at least it did until Henry VIII got involved when, somewhat counter-intuitively, it increased to 7s. 6d in his Second Coinage!  At virtually full weight and VF grade, this is a lovely example of an iconic English late Medieval hammered gold coin.  £6,850

 

WAu-7940:  Henry VII Hammered Tudor Gold Angel.  Type IV, rarer Greyhound Head initial mark (1502-4), Spink 2185.  This is the first Greyhound Head angel I have had.  Very much the new dies type - angel with both feet on the dragon as opposed to the old type with just one foot.  A nice, presentable rarer initial mark hammered gold angel, ex mount, for well under £2,000 (possibly even cheaper if you take up the Coin News advert challenge?!)  Good look in finding any other Angel, for any monarch, for sale at under £2K these days.  £1,850 RESERVED (M.He.21-12-23)

 

WAu-7311:  Henry VIII Hammered Gold Crown of the Double Rose.  Third coinage, initial mark none / WS monogram, 1544-47, Bristol mint.  Spink 2310.  Ex Spink (various tickets here).  Slightly wavy flan with minor edge splits.  A very popular coin and invariably a minimum of £5K in today’s market.  This one priced very competitively at £4,295

 

WAu-7813:  James 1st Stuart Hammered Gold Full Angel.  Second coinage, initial mark Tower: 1612-13.  Spink 2616, North 2081, Schneider –.  Pierced for use as a touch-piece.  This is an historically significant and important coin: it was literally touched by King James 1st before being presented to a sufferer of Scrofula (modern name TB).  Just to reiterate, this coin is guaranteed to have been touched by King James 1st (as well as someone presumed dying with TB!)  This happened at an official Touching Ceremony organised by the palace.  The origins of “Touching” go back to Henry II; the idea being that only God can cure this incurable disease and as the monarch had direct contact with God, the monarch touching the sufferer was the same as God touching.  The gold coin, touched by the king (and thus God himself) was to go around the neck of the sufferer and be always in contact with the skin.  Some years before James 1st, Mary took this very seriously indeed.  She literally pressed the sufferer’s open sores with her own two hands and later in the ceremony, she touched the same places with the gold coin whilst making the sign of the cross.  She then personally threaded a ribbon through the coin and placed it around the neck of the unfortunate individual.  James 1st held his first Touching Ceremony on October 1603.  It has to be said that he was extremely reluctant, partly for religious reasons (he refused point blank to make the sign of the cross) but mainly because he really couldn’t face being around “these superstitious, afflicted people”.  However, much as he was reluctant to even be there, he was even more unwilling to break with Royal tradition so the Touching Ceremonies continued.  See here for some excellent research on a Charles 1st touch-piece – a coin less frequently encountered, in my opinion, than the James 1st touch-piece.  Incidentally, I remember than coin selling for not just more than I was willing to pay but significantly more than I thought even a collector would be willing to pay!  This coin ex Peter Mitchell of Baldwin’s (old ticket in his hand).  Richly toned, good VF and very rare.  £3,850

 

WAu-7816:  1673 Charles II Restoration Period Milled Full Gold Guinea.  Fourth laureate bust with the rounded truncation.  John & Joseph Roettier dies with Blondeau’s machinery – the milling on the edge of the coin was a safeguard against clipping which had been not just a thorn in the side of every hammered period, but rather a stake.  The practise of clipping officially ended here after several hundred years.  The Guinea was so named because some of the gold bullion used came from the country of Guinea, via the Africa Company.  It was a 20 shilling denomination, directly replacing the short-lived 1662 gold Broad of 20 shillings.  The racehorse aficionados among you are probably crying out “21 shillings, 21 shillings!” but revaluation of a guinea to that amount took place in 1717 under George 1st.  Incidentally, there were times prior to 1717 where the actual value of a guinea (and remember, the value of any coin, guineas very much included, was entirely based on the precious metal content) was even higher than 21 shillings due to market fluctuations in the value, or spot price of gold.  Spink 3344.  No mount marks.  £2,775

 

WAu-7817:  1701 William III Milled Full Gold Guinea.  Second laureate bust with a proliferation of hair.  The milling on the edge of the coin was a safeguard against clipping which had been not just a thorn in the side of every hammered period, but rather a stake.  The practise of clipping officially ended with the introduction of milled coinage in 1662.  The Guinea was so named because some of the gold bullion used came from the country of Guinea, via the Africa Company.  It was a 20 shilling denomination, directly replacing the short-lived 1662 gold Broad of 20 shillings of the earlier Charles II.  The racehorse aficionados among you are probably crying out “21 shillings, 21 shillings!” but revaluation of a guinea to that amount took place in 1717 under George 1st.  Incidentally, there were times prior to 1717 where the actual value of a guinea (and remember, the value of any coin, guineas very much included, was entirely based on the precious metal content) was even higher than 21 shillings due to market fluctuations in the value, or spot price of gold.  Spink 3463.  Ex Morton & Eden (their ticket sold with this coin) for £2,000 hammer (£2,600 after commissions) in 2022, ex Spink.  No mount marks and really, a very nice grade example for a William III guinea.  £2,975

 

WAu-7765:  1710 Queen Anne Full Gold Guinea.   Post Scottish union, third draped bust, Spink 3574.  8.36g.  It won’t have escaped your notice that with Queen Anne gold coinage in particular, when they do come up, they are almost always HALF guineas.  It really is hard work finding full guineas.  Very light ex mounting marks at 11, 12 and 1 o’clock but again, find one that doesn’t these days.  However, they really are minor and do not detract.  Sold with a ticket that made no mention of mount marks.  £2,395 RESERVED (M.He.23-5-23)

 

WAu-7818:  1714 Queen Anne Milled Full Gold Guinea.  Post Scottish union, third draped bust.  The milling on the edge of the coin was a safeguard against clipping which had been not just a thorn in the side of every hammered period, but rather a stake.  The practise of clipping officially ended with the introduction of milled coinage in 1662.  The Guinea was so named because some of the gold bullion used came from the country of Guinea, via the Africa Company.  It was a 20 shilling denomination, directly replacing the short-lived 1662 gold Broad of 20 shillings of the earlier Charles II.  The racehorse aficionados among you are probably crying out “21 shillings, 21 shillings!” but revaluation of a guinea to that amount took place in 1717 under George 1st.  Incidentally, there were times prior to 1717 where the actual value of a guinea (and remember, the value of any coin, guineas very much included, was entirely based on the precious metal content) was even higher than 21 shillings due to market fluctuations in the value, or spot price of gold.  It won’t have escaped your notice that with Queen Anne gold coinage in particular, when they do come up, they are almost always HALF guineas.  It really is hard work finding full guineas.  Spink 3574.  Ex Spink with associated Spink tickets.  Interestingly, Spink now appear to use the Ellerby Hoard as a classification guide – their classification is “Ellerby 181-190”, meaning lots 181 through to 190 in the Ellerby Hoard sale that they conducted were all 1714 Queen Anne Guineas.  For context, the Ellerby Hoard is a hoard of 266 17th-18th century hammered and milled gold coins found in a manganese-mottled salt-glazed stoneware vessel in the garden of a house in Ellerby, East Riding of Yorkshire in 2019.  Hoard estimate £200,000; hammer £750,000.  As this guinea is ex Spink (but not ex Ellerby), I think it only fair to compare.  The Ellerby coin that I’ve attached here, lot 187, is clearly not quite as good grade as the one on offer on this website.  Never-the-less, both attracted a Spink grade of “pleasing VF” (NGC got a little carried away and graded it About Uncirculated!)  The Ellerby coin sold for £4,000 after commissions, and that was several years ago with the market ever moving upwards.  Obviously there’s a small premium for provenance to consider as it was very good provenance.  This coin: no mount marks, some lustre, well struck up.  £3,275