A selection of choice Milled coins for sale through HistoryInCoins:

 

 

WCom-5932:  1642 English Civil War Silver Medal.  A military reward from the 3rd Earl of Essex, Robert Devereaux (Oliver Cromwell’s Captain-General and Commander-in-Chief of the Parliamentary army) to an actual soldier in the Cromwellian army.  Silver, cast & chased, 30x22mm. Listed in Medallic Illustration (M.I.298/117, pt. 1) as Rare.  See here The Civil War was a particularly unpleasant period in British history.  Tensions were extremely high between not just the Charles 1st and the Cromwell combatants, but in fact every citizen of the land.  Loyalty to either the Parliamentarians or the Royalists ran deep, suspicion was everywhere and normal, everyday people were actually scared (with good reason) to show loyalty in case the other person was in the opposite camp.  This medal is a tangible link with the Civil War, being not just a generic propaganda or supporters’ medal, but an actual medal given by the 3rd Earl of Essex, Robert Devereaux, with Cromwell’s blessing, to a real soldier who fought in the campaign.  £995

                                  

WCA-5643:  1684 Charles II Tin Farthing.  Very good grade indeed (ex River Thames find – anaerobic conditions) with the date (1684) and the rest of the edge legend being extremely clear.  Peck 537A which is one of the rarest varieties (listed “Extremely Rare”).  These tin coins had an alarming rate of wear from circulation.  A Ferryman’s hoard of W&M tin halfpennies from the River Thames in the 1970’s was made up of 1690 through to 1692 tin coins.  There were no copper 1694 coins leading to the conclusion that the purse was dropped into the Thames 1693 or earlier.  Of the many coins, the 1690’s were all very worn, the 1691’s quite worn and the 1692’s being at least somewhat worn.  The 1690’s coins could only have been in circulation for three years or so but they were all very worn.  Even the coins that had been in circulation for only up to a year or so were worn.  As well as wear, the tin coinage corrodes in air and the soil (tin is far too reactive a metal to be used for coinage) so high grade examples, invariably out of the Thames, are at a premium.  A very nice coin being slightly better than WCA-5569.  £595

 

WCA-5499:  1661 Charles II Silver Coronation Medal.  The official coronation medal designed by Thomas Simon.  An attractive silver medal which effectively heralded the start of the Reformation.  £495

 

 

WCA-5641:  1685 James II Tin Farthing In High Grade.  NVMMORVM*FAMVLVS*1685* edge – Peck 539 (listed very rare).  These tin coins had an alarming rate of wear from circulation.  A Ferryman’s hoard of W&M tin halfpennies from the River Thames in the 1970’s was made up of 1690 through to 1692 tin coins.  There were no copper 1694 coins leading to the conclusion that the purse was dropped into the Thames 1693 or earlier.  Of the many coins, the 1690’s were all very worn, the 1691’s quite worn and the 1692’s being at least somewhat worn.  The 1690’s coins could only have been in circulation for three years or so but they were all very worn.  Even the coins that had been in circulation for only up to a year or so were worn.  As well as wear, the tin coinage corrodes in air and the soil (tin is far too reactive a metal to be used for coinage) so high grade examples, invariably out of the Thames (which this is), are at a premium.  The current 2012 Spink guide (soon to be replaced with increased prices – typically 10%) has this coin in EF at £3,000.  Note the hair detail on this coin and compare it to the Spink plate coin which was the best example they could find.  This is a choice, high grade and rare coin.  £1,695

 

WCA-5481:  1694 William & Mary Copper Proof Halfpenny.  Over weight and larger planchet, en medaille die axis.  Usual die flaw on rim (described in Peck).  Good VF grade.  Peck 612 although the N’s are unusual and seemingly not rerecorded in Peck.  A lovely coin in very nice grade considering the soft nature of the copper used in this period.  £539

 

WCA-5121:  1714 Queen Anne Silver Pattern Farthing.  Large, thick flan.  Peck dies 4 & F.  One of very few examples outside of public establishments.  Very rare.  £560

 

WG-5800:  1720 George 1st Copper Farthing – A Spectacular Double Strike.  Second issue.  Worth a look at this impressive mint error even if you’re not a collector of these things.  The double strike is around 40% and the date appears twice.  They don’t get much better than this.  There is a degree of wear to the coin indicating some circulation as currency so it obviously escaped quality control at the time.  Check recent archived results of London Coins Auctions to see the high prices these errors achieve.  Most are for later, Victorian bronze errors.  Earlier error such as this will be at a premium.  £275

 

WG-6049:  1763 George III Silver “Northumberland” Shilling.  A very small issue, struck on the appointment of the Duke of Northumberland to the post of Lord Lieutenant of Ireland Interestingly, this small issue of possibly £100 face value was the only shilling issued between the 1758 George II and the 1787 George III shillings.  Worse still, there was another 19 year wait after the 1787 issue until the 1816 shillings were issued.  This coin is attractively toned and very nice grade.  An extremely rare date George III shilling.  £995

 

WI-5434:  1690 Irish Gun Money Full Crown.  Struck over a large Gun Money half crown.  Higher grade example thus rare.  £229

 

WAu-6020:  Queen Anne Gold Touch Piece.  Guaranteed to have been touched by Queen Anne herself at an official Touching Ceremony to “cure” Scrofula (modern day Tubercularosis).  Sufferers of the disease were invited to attend by strict invitation only.  A pass was given which allowed entry although no Queen Anne passes have been recorded, leading to the assumption that either they were handwritten paper passes or the old Charles II passes were re-used.  The Queen personally gave every sufferer one of these gold touchpieces The theory was that the Queen touched the gold touchpiece and then personally gave it to the sufferer, so through her God also touched the sufferer.  Queen Anne is recorded as being the most reluctant Toucher out of all the monarchs, getting out of what she could.  The touchpieces were purposefully pierced, always in the same position, in order that sufferers could wear them around their necks, next to their skin.  The vast majority of these would have been melted down and the money spent on everyday living, if not by the sufferer, then surely his or her descendants.  Recipients were not always commoners.  Queen Anne touched Dr Johnson (of the Dictionary fame) when he was 2 ½ on 30 March 1712 His touchpiece, identical to this one, currently resides in the British Museum Dr Johnson’s touchpiece, like this one, also shows little or no sign of wear.  Unlike previous monarchs who physically touched the sufferers’ open sores and wounds, Queen Anne refused to do this, instead opting for a loadstone to do the touching.  She certainly touched the gold touchpieces though.  27th April 1714, three months before Anne died, was the last ever Touching Ceremony performed on British soil.  In total, the practice had been in existence for 50 years.  The Hanoverians (George 1st etc) would have none of it.  This is a high grade example with a provenance going back to 1968 (x2 tickets and a printout).  Touchpieces issued by Anne are much rarer than those issued by other English monarchs.  This is the first I’ve owned and I don’t think I’ve even seen another outside of books and the BM.  £2,275

 

WAu-5936:  1725 George 1st Full Gold Guinea.  Fifth bust with the older portrait of the Hanoverian king who, it was reported, could speak no English.  As a result, the King’s court spoke German.  This coin very close indeed to an overall EF grade (current 2014 price guide for 1725 is just under £4,000).  It is also beautifully toned.  Choice.  £2,925

 

WAu-6061:  1727 George 1st Full Gold Guinea – Key Rare Date.  Fifth bust with the older portrait of the Hanoverian king who, it was reported, could speak no English.  As a result, the King’s court spoke German.  No mount marks, clear fields, nice eye appeal.  The rarest date in the entire Geoge 1st series bar the Prince Elector and the Elephant & Castle.  £1,095

 

WAu-5232:  1772 George III Full Gold Guinea – Love Token.  3rd head, crowned shields.  Unmounted.  Hand engraved to commemorate the birth of William Donald on October 26th, 1814 (extra image).  Partially researched:  attributed to the North East of England. With a name and full date, further research should be straightforward.  A lovely gold artefact – a piece of history.  £465

 

WG-5489:  George III Cartwheel Penny – Engraved Coin – Nelson Interest.  Obv: engraved figure of Britannia leaning on an anchor, ship to left, WILLIAM BOLTON engraved above, 1797 below.  Rev: engraved ship, probably H.M.S. Blanche.  Captain Sir William Bolton married Admiral Lord Nelson’s sister, Catherine.  The sister coin to this one, by the same artist, lies in the Marquess of Milford Haven’s private collection.  See research images here and here Sold with this documentation.  £745