Anne (1702 - 14) Read about Anne

 

 

Gold

 

WAu-6020:  Queen Anne Gold Touch Piece.  Guaranteed to have been touched by Queen Anne herself at an official Touching Ceremony to “cure” Scrofula (modern day Tubercularosis).  Sufferers of the disease were invited to attend by strict invitation only.  A pass was given which allowed entry although no Queen Anne passes have been recorded, leading to the assumption that either they were handwritten paper passes or the old Charles II passes were re-used.  The Queen personally gave every sufferer one of these gold touchpieces.  The theory was that the Queen touched the gold touchpiece and then personally gave it to the sufferer, so through her God also touched the sufferer.  Queen Anne is recorded as being the most reluctant Toucher out of all the monarchs, getting out of what she could.  The touchpieces were purposefully pierced, always in the same position, in order that sufferers could wear them around their necks, next to their skin.  The vast majority of these would have been melted down and the money spent on everyday living, if not by the sufferer, then surely his or her descendants.  Recipients were not always commoners.  Queen Anne touched Dr Johnson (of the Dictionary fame) when he was 2 ½ on 30 March 1712.  His touchpiece, identical to this one, currently resides in the British Museum.  Dr Johnson’s touchpiece, like this one, also shows little or no sign of wear.  Unlike previous monarchs who physically touched the sufferers’ open sores and wounds, Queen Anne refused to do this, instead opting for a loadstone to do the touching.  She certainly touched the gold touchpieces though.  27th April 1714, three months before Anne died, was the last ever Touching Ceremony performed on British soil.  In total, the practice had been in existence for 50 years.  The Hanoverians (George 1st etc) would have none of it.  This is a high grade example with a provenance going back to 1968 (x2 tickets and a printout).  Touchpieces issued by Anne are much rarer than those issued by other English monarchs.  This is the first I’ve owned and I don’t think I’ve even seen another outside of books and the BM.  £2,275

 

 

 

Halfcrowns

 

WCA-5725:  1703 Queen Anne Silver Halfcrown.  Plain angles, VIGO issue.  By no means a common date / denomination combination and the better VIGO issue.  £285

 

WCA-5958:  1707 and 1739 (Queen Anne & George II) Silver Halfcrown Patch / Pill / Snuff Box.  A delightfully constructed box (see extra images here) made out of the two halfcrowns with some extra silver to create the depth of the box.  The lid opens with a flawlessly functioning hinge and the box snaps or clicks together to remain closed most effectively.  Lovely.  £385

 

 

 

Shillings

 

WCA-5750:  1711 Queen Anne Silver Shilling.  Plain angles, 4th bust, post Union.  £75

 

 

 

Maundy

 

WCA-5648:  1704 Queen Anne Silver Groat.  Pre Scottish Union.  £48

 

WCA-5649:  1708 Queen Anne Silver Threepence.  Post Scottish Union.  £48

 

WCA-6422:  1709 Queen Anne Silver Penny.  E.S.C. 2320 – listed Scarce.  Post Scottish Union.  £95

 

 

 

Silver & Copper “Pence”

 

WCA-5121:  1714 Queen Anne Silver Pattern Farthing.  Large, thick flan.  Peck dies 4 & F.  One of very few examples outside of public establishments.  Very rare.  £560

 

WCA-5637:  1713 Queen Anne Copper Farthing.  Plain edge PAX MISSA pattern, obverse 5 and reverse G.  This is Peck 765 and is listed as Extremely Rare.  £245

 

WCA-5638:  1714 Queen Anne Copper Farthing.  Plain edge, obverse 3 and reverse E.  This is Peck 743.  Very rare.  £260

 

WCA-6201:  1709 Queen Anne Copper Halfpenny – Isle of Man.  Cast under James Stanley, 10th Earl of Derby.  The pennies and halfpennies were cast in moulds which accounts for the lack of definition.  Spink 7402 (£250, £900 in 2016 edition).  The recent Spink sale (March 2014) had several examples of Isle of Man coinage but only a single example of the 1709 (first issue) halfpenny.  The hammer price was £400 so with commission that’s around £500.  This one much is streets ahead of that coin, being as good as you’re ever likely to find.  £369

 

 

 

Commemorative Medals

 

WCA-6399:  1702 Queen Anne “Accession” AE Medal.  EF grade on this highly symbolic medal.  £195

 

WCA-5118:  1702 Queen Anne “Accession” Silver Medal.  The dawning of a new era – mutual trust between monarch and subjects and to be fair, it was.  Ultimately a very short concept though.  £295

 

 

 

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